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Need pictures of Parcoblatta species


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This might be a good way to breed Asiablatta kyotensis, Parcoblatta pennsylvanica, Parcoblatta divisa, Parcoblatta lata. Having a large container with cardboard or egg crates and a bare bottom with a large bowl of moist sphagnum moss for the younger nymphs that might need more moisture and a place to lay oothecae?:

http://www.cic-net.c...log/cat6/cat68/

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Maybe, it works for that guy. I look at that site too, you should check out the Archiblatta hoeveni, they are awesome! :wub:

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  • 4 months later...

I finally caught my first wild roaches! Parcoblatta sp.

I took some pictures this morning and posted them on bugguide (here's the best one) and they were promptly marked as frass :-( which was lame, as I've seen better pictures used.

SOOOOOOOO I did another photoshoot this afternoon.

Magelssen Bluff Park in Fillmore County, MN

Back story:

My wife, 7mo daughter, and I went on a road trip to get a bike trailer to haul the little one around town. On our way home, the baby needed to eat, so we stopped at a "scenic overlook" so she could feed the baby.

Here's me and the daughter at the scenic overlook:

11fd0212-be0f-4a4e-98b7-475892e5d1ce.jpg

And here is a surveying marker from the location in Rushford, MN:

8ae74613-2c70-4438-8345-d9f96dc1622b.jpg

While my wife fed the baby, I had about 20 minutes to search for bugs.

Weather was sunny, 70F range. I did not have high hopes. After finding a few snails under a log, I pulled some bark off another log (oak?) and saw a flash of orange/brown. My pulse increased!!! I tried to catch it to put it in the water bottle I had with me... and succeeded in squishing it. The good news was that it confirmed my suspicion... Parcoblatta!!

I bolted for the car to get supplies to hunt better. The clock was ticking. A bunch of bikers came to the scenic overview... smoking, much to the ire of my wife.

I began rapidly pulling bark off and shaking it into a 3 gallon bucket and transferring anything of interest from their into my water bottle.

Eventually my wife insisted that we leave :-( but I hope I found enough to start a small colony!

I caught a total of 5 large nymphs, and brought back a large amount of bark (which I now see has at least one small nymph in it)

They are not residing in a plastic file tote with a latching lid and vaseline around the rim.

Here's a shot of the new home:

0336452a-7b25-41f7-8e57-7c54e33f923f.jpg

So I am SUPER EXCITED!

Here are my best shots (working with my camera is difficult to get good macro shots...)

ffd1474b-02cb-4478-a752-20e5bf119679.jpg

b66a0ebd-3fb1-482e-9062-51905cc08c43.jpg

Here's my favorite shot:

b575ef03-3fb4-414b-8389-5f61a44b42e7.jpg

I'd LOVE help Identifying them!!!

AND.... as long as I'm on the Parcoblatta thread...

Here's a shot of my Parcoblatta divisa (descended from Cariblatta lutea's colony, by way of Kurt N.). Fresh male in the group, and some females/imatures. I did not take them out to photograph them. They need to make babies before they expire!

DSCN1025.jpg

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Cool! I too have accidentally smashed innocent Parcoblatta whilst trying to collect them. :( Hope yours do well, 5 should be enough to start a colony! I might suggest adding a bit of coconut fiber to the wood, just so the substrate is on more of an even level, and to hold moisture a bit better.

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I found this shed today sitting atop a carrot chunk in my parcoblatta enclosure:

http://s1303.photobucket.com/user/salmonsaladsandwic/media/image.jpg1_zpsta1tjydi.jpg.html

I thought when I opened the enclosure that he must really be enjoying his meal, since he wasn't running away...

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  • 2 weeks later...

Yay! My first adult!

http://s1303.photobucket.com/user/salmonsaladsandwic/media/image.jpg1_zpswidcyhjj.jpg.html?sort=3&o=1

Now I just pray there are no holes small enough for him to slip through.

Also, the 7 P. Pennsylvanica nymphs have become big, black subadults and are beautiful:

http://s1303.photobucket.com/user/salmonsaladsandwic/media/image.jpg1_zpsessbsdjl.jpg.html?sort=3&o=

And another one:

http://s1303.photobucket.com/user/salmonsaladsandwic/media/image.jpg1_zpsngjhqcec.jpg.html

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Yup! Today I also found 2 subadult female p. Pennsylvanica under the ol' discarded particle board (the only place I've seen them- even under the other large pieces of rubble nearby I've never found anything but p. virginica. Perhaps it has something to do with the large Formica colony that share the space), which is great because before I only had 2 definite females!

Edit: I just realized that p. Pennsylvanica females have longish wings.... I assumed that the black subadults with very obvious wing buds were male and the equally large lighter colored nymphs/ subadults with no visible wings were females, but now I realize I could be wrong....

Ok this picture has 2 "females" and 1 "male"... I just noticed, however, that the "females" are in fact slightly smaller and I've come to the conclusion that they are just younger nymphs. I thought they were subadult females since I didn't have a "male" for size comparison in the field.

http://s1303.photobucket.com/user/salmonsaladsandwic/media/image.jpg1_zpsdi3yw89g.jpg.html

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Yup! Today I also found 2 subadult female p. Pennsylvanica under the ol' discarded particle board (the only place I've seen them- even under the other large pieces of rubble nearby I've never found anything but p. virginica. Perhaps it has something to do with the large Formica colony that share the space), which is great because before I only had 2 definite females!

Edit: I just realized that p. Pennsylvanica females have longish wings.... I assumed that the black subadults with very obvious wing buds were male and the equally large lighter colored nymphs/ subadults with no visible wings were females, but now I realize I could be wrong....

Ok this picture has 2 "females" and 1 "male"... I just noticed, however, that the "females" are in fact slightly smaller and I've come to the conclusion that they are just younger nymphs. I thought they were subadult females since I didn't have a "male" for size comparison in the field.

http://s1303.photobucket.com/user/salmonsaladsandwic/media/image.jpg1_zpsdi3yw89g.jpg.html

Can u get some pis of the structure under wings when a male molts? I've not seen subadult pennsylvanica with marginal markings before, which makes me wonder if yours are actually divisa

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I do not believe them to be p. divisa because A: I'm in Massachusetts, out of their range according to roachcrossing's map, and B: they're really big. But I'll photograph under the wings anyway. Didn't you say that I "wouldn't believe how variable this species is?" lol

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  • 2 weeks later...

I finally caught my first wild roaches! Parcoblatta sp.

I took some pictures this morning and posted them on bugguide (here's the best one) and they were promptly marked as frass :-( which was lame, as I've seen better pictures used.

SOOOOOOOO I did another photoshoot this afternoon.

Magelssen Bluff Park in Fillmore County, MN

Back story:

My wife, 7mo daughter, and I went on a road trip to get a bike trailer to haul the little one around town. On our way home, the baby needed to eat, so we stopped at a "scenic overlook" so she could feed the baby.

Here's me and the daughter at the scenic overlook:

While my wife fed the baby, I had about 20 minutes to search for bugs.

Weather was sunny, 70F range. I did not have high hopes. After finding a few snails under a log, I pulled some bark off another log (oak?) and saw a flash of orange/brown. My pulse increased!!! I tried to catch it to put it in the water bottle I had with me... and succeeded in squishing it. The good news was that it confirmed my suspicion... Parcoblatta!!

I bolted for the car to get supplies to hunt better. The clock was ticking. A bunch of bikers came to the scenic overview... smoking, much to the ire of my wife.

I began rapidly pulling bark off and shaking it into a 3 gallon bucket and transferring anything of interest from their into my water bottle.

Eventually my wife insisted that we leave :-( but I hope I found enough to start a small colony!

I caught a total of 5 large nymphs, and brought back a large amount of bark (which I now see has at least one small nymph in it)

They are not residing in a plastic file tote with a latching lid and vaseline around the rim.

Here's a shot of the new home:

0336452a-7b25-41f7-8e57-7c54e33f923f.jpg

So I am SUPER EXCITED!

Here are my best shots (working with my camera is difficult to get good macro shots...)

b66a0ebd-3fb1-482e-9062-51905cc08c43.jpg

Here's my favorite shot:

b575ef03-3fb4-414b-8389-5f61a44b42e7.jpg

I'd LOVE help Identifying them!!!

AND.... as long as I'm on the Parcoblatta thread...

Here's a shot of my Parcoblatta divisa (descended from Cariblatta lutea's colony, by way of Kurt N.). Fresh male in the group, and some females/imatures. I did not take them out to photograph them. They need to make babies before they expire!

Adding photos of the roaches from my previous post, a month later, as adults:

ce279a41-7b43-4f61-8d49-ce0aaf326a56.jpg

Female with injured wing

1f6afb05-4a66-4a24-9228-e16f663c3a61.jpg

Female and nymph

6e028f8b-a0a6-44ef-a262-cdbb4d0eba44.jpg

Female again. I think that the 3 largest nymphs that survived were all females....

And now for the newly collected Parcos:

On 6/6/2014 my family went to Lanesboro, MN for the Rhubarb Festival:

d8a3ecff-db08-4b1a-96a0-c9923e6c17ee.jpg

We ate our lunches in Sylvan Park:

cb27be2b-da20-4f0a-80d7-bca1d7e99066.jpg

After lunch, while my wife was feeding the baby, I had about 20 min to climb a hillside and look for bugs... I was about the give up when I caught this male under the bark of a log:

b380e232-89de-441f-8f66-f4dd7a90ffbf.jpg

10ec46f7-cc16-4e43-ae56-251b5e0b79a8.jpg

I caught a female under the same piece of bark. I was not able to get a decent photo of her, but she looked identical to the other three I found last month.

I posted this male to bugguide: http://bugguide.net/node/view/1082360

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