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Containing German cockroaches


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Call me crazy but I'm planing on getting Blattella germanica and I'm wondering that on how to contain them. I've herd that they can climb vasaline and I can't allow that, can anybody tell if it's true and if not tell me another easy way of containing them :D

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Parcoblatta spp. are common throughout much of the US. Otherwise you have to look up what is in your area.

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I haven't kept them, but the ones I see outside are slow and a bit clumsy (for roaches). They can't climb.

If you want to attract them or other native roaches lay down a piece of cardboard over some decaying leaves in a shady area near (but a few meters away) your home. Cover with leaves, brush, grass clippings, or wood, etc and water it a couple times a week. You'll get get all sorts of insects and isopods under it after a couple weeks.

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Thanks for the tip and I know a place where there is alot of leaf litter but is there a chance that I can catch small roach species like Asian roach( Blattella asahinai) by just scooping up leaf litter an putting it in a container because I have seen dead Asian roaches in spider webs and once again keep on posting :)

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  • 3 months later...

Never mind I was force to through them away :( Now I am wondering if there is any wild species of cockroach that will not infest my home. Any suggestion :)

What did you do with the Germans? When mine get loose, I suck them up into a mini-vac and shake them back in their house. When they get overpopulated, I let some go in the woods somewhere if it's nice weather. Just an idea if you still have any running around. Too bad I didn't see your post ealier, cause I know vasoline doesn't work. Others on the site have recommended sticking packing tape to the cage wall or durable teflon (not the flimsy thin white teflon). Good luck with your new species.
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  • 1 month later...
When they get overpopulated, I let some go in the woods somewhere if it's nice weather.
This is very irresponsible. You should never let loose any unwanted or extra roaches to the environment. Even if they're native species there's always the possibility of introducing a disease that could affect them or other species. This applies to all pets of any kind. If you need to dispose of extra roaches then you should double bag them, put them in the freezer for a couples days, and then put the bag in the trash. Look at the problems Florida is dealing with all the non-native animals in the everglades and elsewhere that were once formally kept as pets.
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Are you sure they can survive being frozen? I've heard different views from people. One believes they wouldn't survive winter 'cause they're sub-tropical animals. Another believes they will hibernate if frozen and revive when it's warmer. That's what I hope for any of my released roaches who might not make it far enough underground or inside somewhere before winter. Plus, contrary to popular belief, Orin says in his book that roaches do not carry any disease that their legs cannot retain the germs they walk through.

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Plus, contrary to popular belief, Orin says in his book that roaches do not carry any disease that their legs cannot retain the germs they walk through.

Roaches, like any other organism, can very well carry disease. I believe this statement refers to the spread of disease from roaches to humans, refuting the idea that roaches are disgusting disease vectors. However, roaches can still very well spread disease within their own populations, and that would most likely be very problematic for the ecosystem.

Euthanize your roaches; never release.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Are you sure they can survive being frozen? I've heard different views from people. One believes they wouldn't survive winter 'cause they're sub-tropical animals. Another believes they will hibernate if frozen and revive when it's warmer. That's what I hope for any of my released roaches who might not make it far enough underground or inside somewhere before winter. Plus, contrary to popular belief, Orin says in his book that roaches do not carry any disease that their legs cannot retain the germs they walk through.

I am sure they can survive being frozen. My friend found a lot of German roaches from a bridge in a restaurant that day.

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