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Blaberus craniifer


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We have two forms in the european hobby, I don't know if it's the case in the US. We have that light form and the black one too, I'll post pictures of those ones next week ;)

OK. No we just have the dark form but have two different strains... the "Orin McMonigle" and the "University of California, Riverside"

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Kyle at roachcrossing.com is saying "The tell-tale mark of the death's head roach is the jack-o-lantern face on the pronotum, as well the jet-black wings." He also says "the death's head roach is often (unbelievably) mistaken for several other species..."

Are you sure this is Blaberus craniifer? :)

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They are from a quiet reliable breeder, so I'm quiet sure they are.

As far as I know, the holotype for this species is brown winged, not black, but specimens are highly variable. We talked about it with several other hobbyist, loads of us think that they might be the same species (very difficult to say with this genus), but from different area ;)

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They are from a quiet reliable breeder, so I'm quiet sure they are.

As far as I know, the holotype for this species is brown winged, not black, but specimens are highly variable. We talked about it with several other hobbyist, loads of us think that they might be the same species (very difficult to say with this genus), but from different area ;)

OK :) I am always willing to learn new science. Maybe a few others (e.g., Kyle and Orin) and chime in on this to further add to this interesting discussion :) .

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A bunch of us had a long round and round discussion on this species. According to Kyle the "holotype" of this species was a nymph so there isn't a way to prove which is the true holotype. The more likely explanation is that they are two separate but closely related species, the black winged being a very distinct species. The brown wing is either a poorly classified but closely related species or a hybrid that was mistakenly introduced early on into the hobby and laboratories for test animals.

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A bunch of us had a long round and round discussion on this species. According to Kyle the "holotype" of this species was a nymph so there isn't a way to prove which is the true holotype. The more likely explanation is that they are two separate but closely related species, the black winged being a very distinct species. The brown wing is either a poorly classified but closely related species or a hybrid that was mistakenly introduced early on into the hobby and laboratories for test animals.

Thanks! Makes sense to me... :)

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