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Cockroaches interbreeding (help)


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I was talking to my dad the other day and he thought that insects

can't interbreed without serious genetic side effects

can anyone enlighten me ?

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Insects have a very large gene pool so it isn't as much of an issue. With captive insect colonies it's almost impossible to avoid inbreeding. Even if a ton of inbreeding occurred I don't think you'd see serious problems. There might be a small drop in the reproductive rate of the insects but nothing major.

For example, I have a couple colonies of Blatta lateralis. In total there are about 15-20k roaches. All of those are descendants of 100 nymphs that I originally bought. It is very likely that a lot of inbreeding occurred and the colony is still very healthy and thriving.

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Not having bad recessive genes I have read might allow animals to inbreed. Anyway RoachPissyHisser is talking about interbreeding which is hybridizing, breeding two different species. At least usually breeding two different species the offspring turn out not too healthy or sterile.

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Not having bad recessive genes I have read might allow animals to inbreed. Anyway RoachPissyHisser is talking about interbreeding which is hybridizing, breeding two different species. At least usually breeding two different species the offspring turn out not too healthy or sterile.

I mea't to use the phrase inbreeding, not interbreeding. sorry for the mix up.

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They could inbreed for a few generations. I had a friend that inbred a type of beetle a whole lot without problem and so he does not worry about them inbreeding. I do not know about insects like roaches and mantises though. I was told that there are humans that inbreed and are fine, but those I guess would be an isolated tribe or something that has adapted to have few bad recessive genes?

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Because insects produce 100s to 1000s of offspring in their lifetime, there is a greater chance that the parent's gene's will be passed on. This keeps the gene pool large and helps prevent genetic damage that can occur from inbreeding. I'm not an expert on the subject, but that could be a reason why insects like roaches haven't changed that much over millions of years. Less of their genes are being lost over time.

It's still a good idea to introduce new individuals from a different colony every so often. That'll help keep them healthy and productive.

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Because insects produce 100s to 1000s of offspring in their lifetime, there is a greater chance that the parent's gene's will be passed on. This keeps the gene pool large and helps prevent genetic damage that can occur from inbreeding. I'm not an expert on the subject, but that could be a reason why insects like roaches haven't changed that much over millions of years. Less of their genes are being lost over time.

What you wrote does not sound right. There certainly is a much bigger population of insects than mammals. But out of the 100s or 1000s there is only a small percentage that live right? Otherwise they would overrun the planet if more and more survived.

If you do add individuals watch out for bad stock or hybrids which might be a problem with Blaberus discoidalis and hissers.

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