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Hi,

I'm new to the roach hobby, and i wanted to try finding roaches on my own outdoors. Can you guys give me some tips on finding roahces. Like where they can be found and stuff. I live in Florida where most roaches aren't legal. Thanks!

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For most species look around in rotten logs, under bark etc. In most parts of the country, greenhouses are some of the best places to look for roaches but I'm not sure that applies to Florida since the whole place is basically a greenhouse. (And you don't need greenhouses anyway?)

You can find males of some species (including parcoblatta and presumably panchlora) around lights and on windows at night.

I understand that "palmetto bugs" (periplaneta) are super common in Florida.

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I've read that Florida has Arenivaga. If they're anything like California's, dig through undisturbed sandy patches. Here, they're easy to find under boards after light rain as well. I bet you could also find ootheca of Periplaneta spp. attached to walls where there is food and water available to the roaches. Pop them into a lightly ventilated jar with some moist substrate such as coir and you'll have nymphs in no time.

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Off of memory this is what is native or in florida:

P. nivea

P. americana

P. australasiae

P. brunnea

B. germanica

I *think* Blaberus craniifer, atropos, and some others that I am forgetting.

The most common that you should find depending on where you are: P. americana, australasiae, P. nivea B. germanica

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Thanks for the responses! There are a whole bunch of Blaberus species in the Miami area.

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Here's some more roaches found in FL:

Arenivaga floridensis

Eurycotis floridana

Eurycotis lixa

Epilampra maya

Pseudomops septentrionalis

Cariblatta lutea

Plectoptera poeyi

Parcoblatta caudelli

Parcoblatta fulvescens

Chorisoneura parishi

Latiblattella rehni

Neoblattella detersa

Ischnoptera bilunata

Plectoptera picta

And probably a lot more!

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Here's some more roaches found in FL:

Arenivaga floridensis

Eurycotis floridana

Eurycotis lixa

Epilampra maya

Pseudomops septentrionalis

Cariblatta lutea

Plectoptera poeyi

Parcoblatta caudelli

Parcoblatta fulvescens

Chorisoneura parishi

Latiblattella rehni

Neoblattella detersa

Ischnoptera bilunata

Plectoptera picta

And probably a lot more!

Oh yeah and all of those XD
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Here's some more roaches found in FL:

Arenivaga floridensis

Eurycotis floridana

Eurycotis lixa

Epilampra maya

Pseudomops septentrionalis

Cariblatta lutea

Plectoptera poeyi

Parcoblatta caudelli

Parcoblatta fulvescens

Chorisoneura parishi

Latiblattella rehni

Neoblattella detersa

Ischnoptera bilunata

Plectoptera picta

And probably a lot more!

Let me add more

Parcoblatta lata

Parcoblatta divisa

Parcoblatta pennsylvanica

Parcoblatta uhleriana (they were fairly common in Torreya)

Parcoblatta virginica

Parcoblatta zebra (according to my friend)

Cariblatta lutea lutea and minima

Compsodes species

Myrmecoblatta species

Ischnoptera deropeltiformis

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out of the peripleneta that show up in the house, I hope one of them end up being Australasiae xD

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Does anyone know what periplaneta are most attracted to? I'll try using insect traps

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Thanks! I'll do that right now lol

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Well looks like their are no roaches around my house. So better try near the community dumpster , and If i don't find anything then my community is REALLY clean lol.

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Try looking in dead oak leaves and pine needles. And try looking on dead leaves stuck onto living sweet gum leaves on the living tree (of course go to the low branches where you can reach from the ground unless you have a ladder). I have found Chorisoneura texensis like that.

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