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Blatta orientalis as a "pest" species


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Lately I've read of some folks saying that Blatta Orientalis is not a potential pest species. Online sellers often list this as a non-pest species, however, my experiences with Blatta Orientalis says otherwise..

In my town in Northern California, they are very common. Usually they're seen in parking lots, and sidewalks at night, dozens of them scurrying away as you approach. But I personally have seen a massive Blatta Orientalis in the home of a friend.

These things were everywhere. At first they could only be seen at night, usually in bathrooms, and would scurry away once a light was turned on. After several years, their numbers became MUCH greater. They could be seen at all times of day, under clothes, in the laundry rooms. Even for a roach lover, it was a disgusting sight.

He was not enrolled in any sort of pest control services due to the cost of it. I have no doubt that would have at least kept their numbers down somewhat, but these guys we're dug in so deep, I don't think anything could be done to eradicate them completely.

One day we decided to use a "bug bomb" in the worst area of the home. We came back a few hours later to what seemed like thousands of dead Orientalis. It really was freaky, seeing so many dead insects in one small area. This of course did absolutely nothing to their numbers, as the infestation continued for many years, until the home was sold.

There are actually a lot of homes in Northern California with severe Orientalis infestations. His is not the only one I've come across. Granted Germans are FAR worse, but I thought I would point out that, in my opinion, Blatta Orientalis should be considered a true "pest" species.

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As a licensed pest control technician of 15 years I can tell you the "oriental roach" is very much a pest species. Although in the KY, OH area not a very troublesome one. Associated with sewers, under slab houses and concrete steps and basements. But I seldom have seen signs of true infestations. Usually just a few adults.

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They don't have the potential of Blatella germanica. They more just wander inside and die when the cold weather comes along.

This was far more than just a few individuals from outside. This was a massive, year round infestation of a rather large home.

It's worth adding, however, this was by no means a "clean" house, and it's hardly surprising it was infested by roaches. However the sheer number of them (at least in the thousands, maybe 10s of thousands) tells me they are a very adaptive, prolific species that needs very little heat to thrive.

Again, not an isolated case either. I know of several houses in my town with infestations of this species. Most are in the more moderate level as far as numbers, but they indeed a year round problem.

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here in n. maine we don't even have problems w/ german or american roaches as its way too cold for them. seen a few that came in on produce at the cafeteria i worked at but they didn't survive long. thats kinda a good thing. but if i lost power in my house right now my roaches (and my water pipes) would be finished in hours! and this is a mild winter!

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As a licensed pest control technician of 15 years I can tell you the "oriental roach" is very much a pest species. Although in the KY, OH area not a very troublesome one. Associated with sewers, under slab houses and concrete steps and basements. But I seldom have seen signs of true infestations. Usually just a few adults.

Here in North Carolina I see them at least one church with more than "just a few adults". :) They don't live inside normal houses or at least not usually? So I don't consider them a pest species, plus that they don't cause damage, right?
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Certain houses yes. For example I spray an apartment that use to be a detached garage. After a wet rainy spell the tenants will see quite a few inside. So officially they are in "the book" as a pest. But I think the average house is not humid enough. I found some dying ischnoptera deropeltiformes outside one of my customers last month, talk about being bummed.

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It was my understanding that B. Orientalis aren't very prolific; there are only 16 nymphs per ootheca and they take about a year to reach sexual maturity.

The infestation described must have been a long time in development.

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