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Hisser recomendations


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Me being relatively new to hissers having only ever kept a couple adult male Madagascar hissers I want to keep another species but don't know which one would be the best for me. I want a species that doesn't have super spikes legs and a smaller size. Any hisser species that you'd think would have these characteristics please post the name and any other information.

Thanks in advance!

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E.javanica and E.chopardi fit those guidelines., A.insignis might be another one but I don't know how spiky their legs are.

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I keep them dry with bi-weekly mistings of one corner. They've got coco fiber substrate, with rotting wood and oak leaves. Egg flats and cork bark for hiding. I feed mostly apples and carrots, with the occasional watermelon, sweet potatoe or squash, and pond sticks for protein. I keep their room at 75-85 at all times to help with breeding.

For numbers, I started with 6 adults back in October. 2 or 3 died not long after I recieved them (possibly bad dry food, not sure). I was at probably 200+ but have traded off around 70 recently.

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What is your set up like? This species is not know for breeding fast. Maybe you have a secret you can share with the rest of us. :)

I find that interesting. I have a colony of javanica, portentosa (hybrids) and insignis. The javanica are always fighting and breeding..they're breeding better than either of the other two species..noticeably better and faster..in fact I'm going to order more insignis from Doc soon because I want them to keep up with the javanica..

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Ho spikes are the insignis legs?

The legs spikes on A. insignis are pretty bad actually. Your best bet will be to get a dwarf hisser. (Genus Elliptorhina)

As for the breeding speed of E. javanica, I've had terrible luck with this species. They are very difficult to breed IME.

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I keep them dry with bi-weekly mistings of one corner. They've got coco fiber substrate, with rotting wood and oak leaves. Egg flats and cork bark for hiding. I feed mostly apples and carrots, with the occasional watermelon, sweet potatoe or squash, and pond sticks for protein. I keep their room at 75-85 at all times to help with breeding.

For numbers, I started with 6 adults back in October. 2 or 3 died not long after I recieved them (possibly bad dry food, not sure). I was at probably 200+ but have traded off around 70 recently.

Nice...and thanks!

Does this species do better at lower temps (75 F) versus the other hissers that do well at high temps?

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Nice...and thanks!

Does this species do better at lower temps (75 F) versus the other hissers that do well at high temps?

I don't mean to butt in on a question I wasn't asked, but dwarf hissers (especially E. javanica!) do better at higher temperatures. Low 80s at a minimum.

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I don't mean to butt in on a question I wasn't asked, but dwarf hissers (especially E. javanica!) do better at higher temperatures. Low 80s at a minimum.

Thanks! Just curious since I had them in the 80s and they died out on me. Such a beautiful species but I must have done something wrong. My other hisser species continued to thrive but not these guys...also such a bummer since they are so awesome looking. Is there something special you need to do to get these guys to reproduce compared to other hisser species? Thanks!

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Thanks! Just curious since I had them in the 80s and they died out on me. Such a beautiful species but I must have done something wrong. My other hisser species continued to thrive but not these guys...also such a bummer since they are so awesome looking. Is there something special you need to do to get these guys to reproduce compared to other hisser species? Thanks!

I have no idea. Most of my E. javanica have died out as well, and they haven't made any offspring for me. People who have successfully bred them say they do better at high temperatures, and I know E. chopardi will only reproduce in the 80s, so it's a safe bet that's the case for E. javanica.

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I have no idea. Most of my E. javanica have died out as well, and they haven't made any offspring for me. People who have successfully bred them say they do better at high temperatures, and I know E. chopardi will only reproduce in the 80s, so it's a safe bet that's the case for E. javanica.

OK. Thanks! I would love for someone that has had long term success with this species ( Elliptorhina javanica) to let us know about their enclosure set up and care.

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