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Balta notulata


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Sorry to hear that. I can't offer specific advice, but when things are looking bad, a good clean out or rehousing is the best way to start. You get a good look at the roaches and if you are lucky find out things that could not be noticed simply by eyeing the container. So you did the right thing, anyway. 

Hope things improve, you're a great keeper, you'll get it sorted soon I am sure. 

All the best from Bill. 

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15 hours ago, Bufo Bill said:

Sorry to hear that. I can't offer specific advice, but when things are looking bad, a good clean out or rehousing is the best way to start. You get a good look at the roaches and if you are lucky find out things that could not be noticed simply by eyeing the container. So you did the right thing, anyway. 

Hope things improve, you're a great keeper, you'll get it sorted soon I am sure. 

All the best from Bill. 

Thanks, I appreciate it. Hopefully now that I've cleaned everything out they'll do better, one of the nymphs molted today, so that's a good sign. :)

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Thinking about it a bit more, I have had inverts that require regular clean outs or freshening up. They just seemed to have a lower tolerance, whether towards pathogens or nitrates I never really determined. Never had that bother with roaches before though.

Maybe they don't like stagnant air? A few more vents may be an idea?

Just putting a couple of ideas out there, use your own discretion, obviously.  

Regards from Bill. 

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Sorry to hear that! I agree that a nice clean out should help things improve and that's definitely a good sign that you already have nymphs molting again. I wonder if because they're small ectobiids that they just naturally have less of a tolerance towards certain stressors? 

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I swear I replied to you all several days ago, for some reason my tablet must have deleted the message before posting it. -_-

On 12/3/2016 at 7:36 AM, Bufo Bill said:

Thinking about it a bit more, I have had inverts that require regular clean outs or freshening up. They just seemed to have a lower tolerance, whether towards pathogens or nitrates I never really determined. Never had that bother with roaches before though.

Maybe they don't like stagnant air? A few more vents may be an idea?

Just putting a couple of ideas out there, use your own discretion, obviously.  

Regards from Bill. 

Yes, being Ectobiids they are much more fragile than other roaches and can be more sensitive to poor conditions. 

I'm really hoping stagnant air or limited ventilation is not a problem for them, seeing as they don't have any ventilation whatsoever, the babies would get out of any holes I drill/melt into the cage and I don't have any screen or the means to install in in their enclosure. 

On 12/3/2016 at 8:43 PM, pannaking22 said:

Sorry to hear that! I agree that a nice clean out should help things improve and that's definitely a good sign that you already have nymphs molting again. I wonder if because they're small ectobiids that they just naturally have less of a tolerance towards certain stressors? 

Well that's what I was hoping, however another nymph died and their enclosure became completely overgrown with fuzzy mold, had to move them yet again into a fresh enclosure, I have a total of three nymphs, two unhealthy unsexed ones and one female nymph that is seemingly healthy, and two adults, also both females. If my other two nymphs die or turn out to be females as well, then it's over. :(

On 12/4/2016 at 9:59 AM, Cariblatta lutea said:

Sorry for your loss :( I've had similar problem with other species before. Fortunately the condition goes away if you move the specimens to new enclosure and provide plenty of food. Hope the remaining specimens recover for you and breed! 

Thanks, that's good to hear, hopefully my remaining individuals recover and reproduce, I really want to keep this species going in my collection, I love the patterning on the adults.

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  • 4 years later...

Got this species again, they came close to being lost from US culture, but mine are doing well and hopefully next generation I can start spreading them around in the hobby! :)


Nymph:

Baltanotulata2020%25236.JPG


Adult:

Baltanotulata2020%252313.JPG

Baltanotulata2020%252314.JPG

Baltanotulata2020%252318.JPG

Baltanotulata2020%252311.JPG

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