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Myrmecoblatta sp.


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Cool! Is there a scientifically established relationship between these and the ants, or is it just taking advantage of favourable climate and food supply, like infestations in human homes?

All the best from Bill. :D

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Cool! Is there a scientifically established relationship between these and the ants, or is it just taking advantage of favourable climate and food supply, like infestations in human homes?

All the best from Bill. :D

They probably just take advantage on ants like ant crickets. Apparently they were feeding on plant matters that ant has brought in the nest cause most of the specimens had green matter in their stomach.

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Seeing as how you love little roaches, that day won't be long from now.

Yep, I love me some tiny roaches! :D

Thanks :) So far they've not had any problem accepting fish flakes and pellets so hopefully they'll be easy to raise

That's good, I hope the ootheca will be easy to incubate, I know one person got ootheca from a female but they never hatched. :(

Can they climb?

Hopefully within few months :)

That'd be nice! :)

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It seems that only adult males can climb, and they are very good at it! Almost lost my male cause it darted out of the vial I had it in. lol

Interesting, well at least the females don't climb! The males of this species look very similar to Compsodes males, just on a tiny scale.

So, it's possible that these are an undescribed species, correct? No Myrmecoblatta species have ever been reported from AZ.

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Interesting, well at least the females don't climb! The males of this species look similar to Compsodes males, just on a tiny scale.

So, it's possible that these are an undescribed species, correct? No Myrmecoblatta species have ever been reported from AZ.

It's probably M. rehni but there's always a chance that these turn out to be a new species ;)

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It's probably M. rehni but there's always a chance that these turn out to be a new species ;)

Interesting, well let us know how they do, would love for these to become established in the hobby! :D

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Found several ooth in the enclosure. They are paper thin and only contains about 3 ish eggs per case. All were glued on the piece of paper towel I added in the enclosure.

Ooh nice, they sound interesting looking, got any pics? That's a pretty small number of eggs, hopefully they lay a lot of ootheca per female.

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I want some lol I need to visit arizona. What are your best collecting states near CA?

CA has got some great roach species, some Arenivaga, Eremoblatta, Parcoblatta americana, and of course there's the introduced Luridiblatta trivittata. AZ is probably the closest roach "hotspot" to you.

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Ooh nice, they sound interesting looking, got any pics? That's a pretty small number of eggs, hopefully they lay a lot of ootheca per female.

Unfortunately I don't have any pics atm, but will take some pics once I get back home on Friday.

I want some lol I need to visit arizona. What are your best collecting states near CA?

AZ is pretty much the only state closest to CA with high diversity of roaches.

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Unfortunately I don't have any pics atm, but will take some pics once I get back home on Friday.

Awesome, can't wait to see them! :)

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