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Roach ID?


charzard
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The first one is a Parcoblatta virginica male, the second individual is a P.pennsylvanica male I'm pretty sure.

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I just found some like the first along with super dark females. I am amazed at their ability to fly as well as a moth. Fast little buggers.

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15 minutes ago, Cariblatta lutea said:

Both are male P. virginica, with second specimen being a darker morph. 

Man..how can you tell? I was trying to look at the differences between each species. They just look very much alike. Thanks 

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16 hours ago, Cariblatta lutea said:

Both are male P. virginica, with second specimen being a darker morph. 

Woah, what? That's crazy, looks so much like a pensylvanica or divisa male, can't believe some virginica can look like that! :o

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  • 2 months later...

The female does look like Rhicnoda, the male could be as well, but it could also be another species from the Epilamprinae though. 

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8 hours ago, Hisserdude said:

it could also be another species from the Epilamprinae

I don't think so - took'em all from one heap of leaves, as large nymphs, male molted to imago earlier and died.

Moreover, he had managed to mate with female shortly after she molted for the last time - so now I've about a dozen or more I2-nymphs... If they're interspecific hybrids, I'll be very much surprised.

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10 hours ago, mehraban said:

I don't think so - took'em all from one heap of leaves, as large nymphs, male molted to imago earlier and died.

Moreover, he had managed to mate with female shortly after she molted for the last time - so now I've about a dozen or more I2-nymphs... If they're interspecific hybrids, I'll be very much surprised.

Ah OK, they are likely the same species then! Nice find, hope they do well for you! :)

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  • 2 months later...

... So they've perished.

Don't understand how\why - just perished. The one and the only species of all my roaches, more than 50; all the rest are feeling better or worse, but feeling.

I'm now back home - travelled for 1,5 months, and there're not even anything like remnants in their enclosure. Just disappeared without any traces.

 

Food, humidity, shelters - everything seemed to be OK, but the result is somehow stunning for me.

Moreover: I've a colony of some woodlice in the same enclosure, and they've not just survived - they're now innumerable, colony is bursting with youngs.

 

Does anybody has anything like an experience of woodlice exterminating roaches in polyculture? O_o

 

 

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6 hours ago, mehraban said:

... So they've perished.

Don't understand how\why - just perished. The one and the only species of all my roaches, more than 50; all the rest are feeling better or worse, but feeling.

I'm now back home - travelled for 1,5 months, and there're not even anything like remnants in their enclosure. Just disappeared without any traces.

Food, humidity, shelters - everything seemed to be OK, but the result is somehow stunning for me.

Moreover: I've a colony of some woodlice in the same enclosure, and they've not just survived - they're now innumerable, colony is bursting with youngs.

Does anybody has anything like an experience of woodlice exterminating roaches in polyculture? O_o

Sometimes isopods can out-breed and overpower certain roaches, particularly fragile species, (which Epilamprids seem to be). There's also a good possibility your roaches just died for some reason, and then were devoured by the isopods, (which can eat their bodies, exoskeleton and all).

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13 hours ago, Hisserdude said:

Sometimes isopods can out-breed and overpower certain roaches, particularly fragile species, (which Epilamprids seem to be). There's also a good possibility your roaches just died for some reason, and then were devoured by the isopods, (which can eat their bodies, exoskeleton and all).

Yes, I think so, too; the main question for me is the reason. Maybe some disease.

They were F0, just offspring from WC animals, so it's quite possible.

Woodlice were quite tolerant when roaches were L1, though quite numerous (they're somehow pesting in my vivariums, brought them occasionally from Lao several years ago, now they're literally everywhere, even with chilopods and scorpions...), so, IMO, if they took part in devouring, then they consumed either dead or dying insects.

12 hours ago, Betta132 said:

Are you certain they didn't escape? 

If I were you, I'd try and find more. Love the textured back on the females! They look almost like they have little crocodile scales. 

Yes, I'm sure. They can't climb polypropylene anyway, and enclosure is always tightly closed (no phorids, sciarids etc., so meshes are fine, boxes are closed).

And yea, I've already found :) - not adults, about 20 large nymphs, from another location (that were from Myanmar, these are from Lao), but, IMO, it's one species, Ricnoda rugosa is widespread over all the region, from Myanmar to Vietnam.

Maybe, in spring I can go to Myanmar again, though... 

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14 hours ago, mehraban said:

Yes, I think so, too; the main question for me is the reason. Maybe some disease.

They were F0, just offspring from WC animals, so it's quite possible.

Woodlice were quite tolerant when roaches were L1, though quite numerous (they're somehow pesting in my vivariums, brought them occasionally from Lao several years ago, now they're literally everywhere, even with chilopods and scorpions...), so, IMO, if they took part in devouring, then they consumed either dead or dying insects.

Yes, I'm sure. They can't climb polypropylene anyway, and enclosure is always tightly closed (no phorids, sciarids etc., so meshes are fine, boxes are closed).

And yea, I've already found :) - not adults, about 20 large nymphs, from another location (that were from Myanmar, these are from Lao), but, IMO, it's one species, Ricnoda rugosa is widespread over all the region, from Myanmar to Vietnam.

Maybe, in spring I can go to Myanmar again, though... 

Well, I'm glad you caught more of them, hope you are successful in culturing them this time around! :)

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