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Phortioeca phoraspoides


Xenoblatta
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Wow, so odd! :o The nymphs are like dalmation-colored Lanxoblatta rudis, but the adults (minus the pronotum) are very similar in appearance to Eublaberus!

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8 hours ago, Hisserdude said:

OMG!!!! :o These are amazing, I need them in my life LOL! :lol: :wub: What husbandry needs do they have?

Well... they have similar husbandry needs to any Zetoborinae that lives in dead wood and warm places (around 26°C—30°C). A lot of dead wood, specially with soft surfaces for them to feel camouflaged as flat roaches :-D. 

They don't need a really moist substrate (how it seems like in some of the pictures above), some slight humidity in the substrate and air is just fine :-) 

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Very nice to see those in breeding. I had a different species, and although they are similar to Lanxoblatta in many ways (like the need for flat wood pieces), I agree that they take substrate dryness much better than their smaller relatives. It's a great genus to work with.
@Hisserdude Their nymphs are a bit bulkier than Lanoblatta's.

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6 hours ago, Xenoblatta said:

Well... they have similar husbandry needs to any Zetoborinae that lives in dead wood and warm places (around 26°C—30°C). A lot of dead wood, specially with soft surfaces for them to feel camouflaged as flat roaches :-D. 

They don't need a really moist substrate (how it seems like in some of the pictures above), some slight humidity in the substrate and air is just fine :-) 

 

3 hours ago, wizentrop said:

Very nice to see those in breeding. I had a different species, and although they are similar to Lanxoblatta in many ways (like the need for flat wood pieces), I agree that they take substrate dryness much better than their smaller relatives. It's a great genus to work with.
@Hisserdude Their nymphs are a bit bulkier than Lanoblatta's.

Good to know, thanks for the information! :) Sounds like they are fairly easy to breed. They are a stunning species, really hope they'll make their way into the US hobby one day! :D

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