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Periplaneta japonica, my first Periplaneta species


Martin
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This weekend I received 10 small nymphs of Periplaneta japonica.

This is my first Periplaneta species. I was always very fearful of jumping into Periplaneta because of their looks, speed, climbing abilities, etc... but after receiving these beauties, I think I was mistaken.

Images

They are super chilled nymphs... they are not bolty at all. I managed to have one nymph staying put on the same place, while i took photos for at least 10 minutes.

One thing that I didn't expect was that these nymphs are poor climbers¬†ūü§Ē¬†... it was awkward

Lets hope they remain like this while growing up.

It is a small colony, and I am already considering to buy another 20... I like my starter colonies to be 30 individuals at least.

What are your experiences with Periplaneta species? Any tips/suggestions/comments?

I will keep you updated on their progress!

Thank you,

Cheers!

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I have started Periplaneta colonies with the local pest species before, and I always found them to go crazy at feeding time. They would choose the most inopportune times to start running up and down the walls. As I recall, the nymphs were less chaotic, and I think they also climbed less because the adults were the ones trying to test my reaction time when opening the tank to add food. I never spent much time observing them because they were just a pest species I was raising to feed amblypygi, but the nymphs being poor climbers would be consistent with what I remember about the colonies. 

From observing the Periplaneta americana present locally, they are good fliers, and you will likely need to be prepared to go chasing them across the room if your colony grows large enough. My colony never reached the size to where there were ever more that 5-10 adults to monitor when I needed to open the tank. From raising Panchlora nivea, though, which seem similarly chaotic, I imagine that with a larger colony, flying would become more common. 

Basically, I would recommend that you not let your guard down because they seem calm. 

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My male adult australians would run to the top of the enclosure any time I opened it but I dont know if that translates well to your species in question. Either way I had no problem with them when I used liberal amounts of vasoline along the sides of my enclosure. Also just curious where you acquired your nymphs if you dont mind me asking it would be fun to try keeping a small handful of these guys :)

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1 hour ago, The Mantis Menagerie said:

I have started Periplaneta colonies with the local pest species before, and I always found them to go crazy at feeding time. They would choose the most inopportune times to start running up and down the walls. As I recall, the nymphs were less chaotic, and I think they also climbed less because the adults were the ones trying to test my reaction time when opening the tank to add food. I never spent much time observing them because they were just a pest species I was raising to feed amblypygi, but the nymphs being poor climbers would be consistent with what I remember about the colonies. 

From observing the Periplaneta americana present locally, they are good fliers, and you will likely need to be prepared to go chasing them across the room if your colony grows large enough. My colony never reached the size to where there were ever more that 5-10 adults to monitor when I needed to open the tank. From raising Panchlora nivea, though, which seem similarly chaotic, I imagine that with a larger colony, flying would become more common. 

Basically, I would recommend that you not let your guard down because they seem calm. 

Thank you! It seems I will have to plan and design their final enclosure properly ! I want to use them both as feeders and pets depending on their reproduction speed.

14 minutes ago, TheInv4sion said:

My male adult australians would run to the top of the enclosure any time I opened it but I dont know if that translates well to your species in question. Either way I had no problem with them when I used liberal amounts of vasoline along the sides of my enclosure. Also just curious where you acquired your nymphs if you dont mind me asking it would be fun to try keeping a small handful of these guys :)

I am located in South China region, and I acquired them from one of the Chinese keepers up North. I can give you the contact privately, but at this moment, I believe is not a good time to buy, North China is already cold for an international shipment, locally still ok, as packages take only few hours to start their way down South were temperatures are still at 25C.

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Yesterday received another 16/17 Yamato roach nymphs (Periplaneta japonica) from the same seller. I thought that 10 nymphs were not enough for a starter colony.

So, lets hope for a steady growth! 

One thing I am noticed again and again is that, although looking similar to red runners (as nymphs), their feeding behavior is not frantic or responsive... they are way too chilled, and then it clicked!

Since they are originally from Japan (freezing winter temps), and because @Hisserdudementioned something related to diapause so I decided to find out more!

After a quick research, i found these links and papers:

1 - Winter Survival and Freeze Tolerance in a Northern Cockroach, Periplaneta japonica (Blattidae: Dictyoptera)

"...all nymphal instars (except for the first one) have an ability to enter diapause"

2 - Flexible life cycle of a cockroach Periplaneta japonica with nymphal diapause

image.png.ee0bc64746675caa2a524f5bb2100aa4.png

3 - Stage composition of overwintering field populations of the Japanese cockroach, Periplaneta Japonica

image.png.a1a8f408e2655224c5f757c127078de5.pngimage.png.34bb8c706cd752f8288139ceec115ef7.png

My experience with diapause in ants, is that most species wont feed at all during diapause. I was looking to find out if there was any reference to the feeding behavior in the Yamato roach nymphs during diapause, but unfortunately I couldnt find any so far.

I am wondering if what I am observing is actually the diapause stage?

I have seen them feeding, but again, its just some nibbles and they are done. Their bodies look slender and not the glutton type, even after feeding.

Any ideas? 

Cheers!

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Very interesting, they may actually require a diapause to develop properly then... Kind of annoying lol, but shouldn't be too hard. 

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Because of the cold weather front that has hit Macau recently, the temperature drop has made all my roach bins halt their external activity. The room is now at 20C during daytime and dropping at night to 15C.

Most of the roaches are now underground or hiding.

The Yamato Nymphs are congregating in two separate groups under some leaves.

You can take a quick peek as I expose them to the light, on the link down below.

Video

Lovely yellow coloration don't you think?

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On 12/3/2020 at 9:16 PM, Martin said:

Because of the cold weather front that has hit Macau recently, the temperature drop has made all my roach bins halt their external activity. The room is now at 20C during daytime and dropping at night to 15C.

Most of the roaches are now underground or hiding.

The Yamato Nymphs are congregating in two separate groups under some leaves.

You can take a quick peek as I expose them to the light, on the link down below.

Video

Lovely yellow coloration don't you think?

Well that's good, they should do great for you then! ūüėĄ

Cool, very nice looking for a Periplaneta! 

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  • 2 weeks later...

The colony seems to be doing great !

Uncovering part of the Colony

They are clearly more active at night but anytime of the the day, they congregate in two particular areas, not sure because of pheromones or what, but there is a type of leaf they like to stick to.

As you can see, some are really plump¬†ūü•į ready for winter ūüćá

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