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New Hobbyist Seeking Advice For Several Roach Species


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Hi Everyone!

I'm a fairly new roach hobbyist (Been in the hobby around a year now). I'm getting several new species and have consulted some helpful websites such as RoachCrossing and have basic care requirements. I wanted to know if anyone had any in depth care advice for any of these species? I totally understand some of these are not commonly kept so I understand if not many people keep them. I'll list them below and anyone feel free to chime in and share your experiences with them. Anything helps!

New Species on the Way (In about a month):

Periplaneta americana (White Eye and Black Variants) - I know these guys are pretty hardy but I would love any extra advice on rearing them. 

Hemithyrsocera palliata - These guys looked so interesting and I'd love to know any advice on their care. I wasn't able to find much online but was able to get basic care from RoachCrossing.

Anallacta methanoides - Another one that does not have much info I could find. Beautiful species though.

Rhyparobia cf. capelloi - I was told by Kyle of RoachCrossing that this species is uncommonly kept; I haven't found much info beyond basics. 

cf. Neostylopyga propinqua - Cool species that I'd love more advice on!

Simandoa conserfariam - I'd love any advice for these as I really want my future culture to do well so that more of these can be in the hobby. 

New Species (On the way this week):

These I've gotten much more info for but any advice is welcome!

Paratemnopteryx couloniana 

Blaberus fusca 

Both of these I have found info on but would love extra advice!

Any info anyone can give would be much appreciated! 

Thanks!

 

 

 

 

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On 4/7/2021 at 10:31 PM, RenOfTheRoaches said:

Hi Everyone!

I'm a fairly new roach hobbyist (Been in the hobby around a year now). I'm getting several new species and have consulted some helpful websites such as RoachCrossing and have basic care requirements. I wanted to know if anyone had any in depth care advice for any of these species? I totally understand some of these are not commonly kept so I understand if not many people keep them. I'll list them below and anyone feel free to chime in and share your experiences with them. Anything helps!

New Species on the Way (In about a month):

Periplaneta americana (White Eye and Black Variants) - I know these guys are pretty hardy but I would love any extra advice on rearing them. 

Rhyparobia cf. capelloi - I was told by Kyle of RoachCrossing that this species is uncommonly kept; I haven't found much info beyond basics. 

cf. Neostylopyga propinqua - Cool species that I'd love more advice on!

The primary thing to worry about with P.americana and cf. N. propinqua is just maintaining a moist environment - both won't do great in the long run if they're allowed to dry out too often.

Rhyparobia cf. capelloi do swell with one moist corner and the rest of the enclosure dry. 

Not sure if you were looking for more info than that, but none of the species I mentioned are that tough, so there's not a lot more to add.

 

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On 4/7/2021 at 11:31 PM, RenOfTheRoaches said:

Hi Everyone!

I'm a fairly new roach hobbyist (Been in the hobby around a year now). I'm getting several new species and have consulted some helpful websites such as RoachCrossing and have basic care requirements. I wanted to know if anyone had any in depth care advice for any of these species? I totally understand some of these are not commonly kept so I understand if not many people keep them. I'll list them below and anyone feel free to chime in and share your experiences with them. Anything helps!

New Species on the Way (In about a month):

Periplaneta americana (White Eye and Black Variants) - I know these guys are pretty hardy but I would love any extra advice on rearing them. 

Hemithyrsocera palliata - These guys looked so interesting and I'd love to know any advice on their care. I wasn't able to find much online but was able to get basic care from RoachCrossing.

Anallacta methanoides - Another one that does not have much info I could find. Beautiful species though.

Rhyparobia cf. capelloi - I was told by Kyle of RoachCrossing that this species is uncommonly kept; I haven't found much info beyond basics. 

cf. Neostylopyga propinqua - Cool species that I'd love more advice on!

Simandoa conserfariam - I'd love any advice for these as I really want my future culture to do well so that more of these can be in the hobby. 

New Species (On the way this week):

These I've gotten much more info for but any advice is welcome!

Paratemnopteryx couloniana 

Blaberus fusca 

Both of these I have found info on but would love extra advice!

Any info anyone can give would be much appreciated! 

Thanks!

 

 

 

 

Wow, quite the haul! Use a substrate such as cocopeat/ecoearth, and I also agree to get the roach book. Make sure to use cork bark as hides.

 

Enjoy!

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Hi Everyone! 

Thanks for the advice! I actually own For The Love of Cockroaches (Amazing book btw). Just was looking for any other insight.  I really appreciate the information, it's bound to be helpful! Hoping everything goes well! I hopefully can get them all to breed and be able to spread more of them in the hobby. They should be a lot of fun to raise!

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2 minutes ago, RenOfTheRoaches said:

Hi Everyone! 

Thanks for the advice! I actually own For The Love of Cockroaches (Amazing book btw). Just was looking for any other insight.  I really appreciate the information, it's bound to be helpful! Hoping everything goes well! I hopefully can get them all to breed and be able to spread more of them in the hobby. They should be a lot of fun to raise!

:) Great! Good luck!

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Love Orin's books btw! I also own the Isopods one and the small centipede handbook. Never knew centipedes ate fruits until I read it. Sure enough,  my Vietnamese Giant loved a banana treat the other night. 

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My advice for the smaller fast climbing species that are prone to escape would be make an enclosure with a big door and smaller access ports, that way you can manage the cage easily and still be able to do a tear down when needed.

Personally I like glass tanks. You can make a escape proof lid out of plexiglass or polycarbonate that sits inside the lip of the tank. Especially for a day active sp like H palliata. That way you can enjoy watching them without risk for escape.

There is a balance that needs to be achieved for the small humidity loving species. A range of moisture and temperature is needed. I recommend a ten gallon tank or a 20 long with a layer of sphagnum moss that ranges from moist to dry on top of the main substrate. Then comes the need for a temperature range 85 to 90 on the warm side to room temps on the cool end the same heating pads for reptiles work very well. 

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3 hours ago, Alex said:

My advice for the smaller fast climbing species that are prone to escape would be make an enclosure with a big door and smaller access ports, that way you can manage the cage easily and still be able to do a tear down when needed.

Personally I like glass tanks. You can make a escape proof lid out of plexiglass or polycarbonate that sits inside the lip of the tank. Especially for a day active sp like H palliata. That way you can enjoy watching them without risk for escape.

There is a balance that needs to be achieved for the small humidity loving species. A range of moisture and temperature is needed. I recommend a ten gallon tank or a 20 long with a layer of sphagnum moss that ranges from moist to dry on top of the main substrate. Then comes the need for a temperature range 85 to 90 on the warm side to room temps on the cool end the same heating pads for reptiles work very well. 

Thanks for the advice! I was most concerned with H. palliata as I want to keep them secure but still allow them ample light as they're day active; plus I'd love to watch them. Would you cut a ventilation hole for mesh in the plexiglass lid or just drill holes? Would I go to hardware store to get something like that made? I'm a beginner in DIY stuff and own a power tool or two but I'm no bob the Builder haha.

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Order stainless steel micro mesh either 100 or 150 it’s available on eBay. A small roll will be plenty. Unfortunately most hardware stores don’t sell such specialty materials.

In terms of getting it made for you. You can try looking for a shop that does signs in plastic. They can cut plexiglass, glass, or twin wall plastic. A small mom and pop place is usually happy to help out for minimal cost. But do remember you must frame plexiglas in metal, or else it will warp when heated. Glass and twin-wall will not warp so that might be a easier option for you.

Yes I would definitely cut a vent. A 2 inch circular saw hole is enough for them. You can use any gel or two part adhesive. I really like silicone because it can flex if it has to. Glue guns don’t seem to stick so well for me. You can do a inexpensive LED strip light from HD. 

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Plastic bins are very prone to cracking when you cut the holes. I've been heating up a 3/4" chisel to melt through, and make a large rectangle opening. Then using epoxy to glue a (larger) steel screen over the hole. It takes me about 30 minutes per bin to set up, and works very well.

 

Here is the stainless screen I use. $10 US. You can cut into pieces and make 9-12 bins depending on the vent size you want.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B088H3VWNV/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

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51 minutes ago, Smiley said:

Plastic bins are very prone to cracking when you cut the holes. I've been heating up a 3/4" chisel to melt through, and make a large rectangle opening. Then using epoxy to glue a (larger) steel screen over the hole. It takes me about 30 minutes per bin to set up, and works very well.

 

Here is the stainless screen I use. $10 US. You can cut into pieces and make 9-12 bins depending on the vent size you want.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B088H3VWNV/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Hi! Yes I agree they do crack though they are really convenient. I can get away with a heavy duty boxcutter on some bins but others need a power tool or they crack. I'm also extremely apprehensive about putting heating elements on plastic directly such as pads. They're known to malfunction, even on a thermostat, and would start a fire at worst, and at the least cook the colony. I know people do it but it makes me nervous so I use heat emitters that sit away from the top of the bin and my dubia love it. Haha I know that was off topic. I'll have to check out the screen, as I'd love something that a dome lamp can sit on. I got some aluminum screen from lowes the other day but steel is even better. Thanks for the advice! 

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1 hour ago, Alex said:

Order stainless steel micro mesh either 100 or 150 it’s available on eBay. A small roll will be plenty. Unfortunately most hardware stores don’t sell such specialty materials.

In terms of getting it made for you. You can try looking for a shop that does signs in plastic. They can cut plexiglass, glass, or twin wall plastic. A small mom and pop place is usually happy to help out for minimal cost. But do remember you must frame plexiglas in metal, or else it will warp when heated. Glass and twin-wall will not warp so that might be a easier option for you.

Yes I would definitely cut a vent. A 2 inch circular saw hole is enough for them. You can use any gel or two part adhesive. I really like silicone because it can flex if it has to. Glue guns don’t seem to stick so well for me. You can do a inexpensive LED strip light from HD. 

That makes sense! I've got a rotary cutter that I can use for cutting ventilation and actually have some heat resistant aluminum screen on hand that I got to upgrade my dubia bin. I've seen lots of mom and pop shops that do signage and stuff so I'll check there and at a hardware store. Didn't know that about plexiglass; I'll keep that in mind if heating needs to go on top. Thanks, this has all been very helpful in getting some ideas for set ups!

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You guys are crazy! Box cutters and chisels?! A scrap piece of smooth plywood as backing with a simple clamp to prevent the work piece from moving is all you need If you want to make circular holes or use a drill bit. 

Different materials have a learning curve and plastics like plexiglass, lexan, hdpe, and ldpe will crack when cold. The trick is heating it up till it’s got just a little bit of give to it. You can use a hair dryer or just put the whole piece in  a oven and set to low. 

Brad point bits are best for smooth clean holes as they eat away the material more evenly. But still use a scrap backing when applying force.

When using a hole saw first get the guide bit in then run it in reverse. That way the heat from the friction of the teeth are what’s cutting the plastic and it will come out smooth. 

I will never recommend heating elements glued or screwed against plastic. Glass is better and safer. It is inert, water proof, and most important of all it is crystal clear so you can actively observe your charges. It’s huge draw back is the weight and pro ness to shattering, so I never go over 30 gal fish tank size.

Aluminum screen is far to large. It does work for almost all of them but not B germanica sized ones! 

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On 4/13/2021 at 11:46 PM, Alex said:

You guys are crazy! Box cutters and chisels?! A scrap piece of smooth plywood as backing with a simple clamp to prevent the work piece from moving is all you need If you want to make circular holes or use a drill bit. 

Different materials have a learning curve and plastics like plexiglass, lexan, hdpe, and ldpe will crack when cold. The trick is heating it up till it’s got just a little bit of give to it. You can use a hair dryer or just put the whole piece in  a oven and set to low. 

Brad point bits are best for smooth clean holes as they eat away the material more evenly. But still use a scrap backing when applying force.

When using a hole saw first get the guide bit in then run it in reverse. That way the heat from the friction of the teeth are what’s cutting the plastic and it will come out smooth. 

I will never recommend heating elements glued or screwed against plastic. Glass is better and safer. It is inert, water proof, and most important of all it is crystal clear so you can actively observe your charges. It’s huge draw back is the weight and pro ness to shattering, so I never go over 30 gal fish tank size.

Aluminum screen is far to large. It does work for almost all of them but not B germanica sized ones! 

Thanks for the advice! I agree, plastic and heat worry me too. People do it but I reaaaaaly don't wanna risk melting or starting a fire. 

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  • 2 months later...
On 4/7/2021 at 9:31 PM, RenOfTheRoaches said:

Anallacta methanoides

Don't know if you still have these, but of all the roaches listed on roachcrossing's site, these are the one species I disagree with his care advice on the most... For the majority of people besides Kyle, these do best when kept quite humid, and minimally to moderately ventilated. He recommends keeping them dry, but everyone I ever sold them to who followed that advice ended up with a bunch of dead nymphs in a short amount of time. Whereas if you keep them humid, they'll breed like pests, in which case the trouble is preventing overpopulation crashes, not in getting them to survive to adulthood. I do have a full caresheet for this species here if you are interested.

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