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Hisser questions...


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I have colonies of G. portentosa and E. chopardi and believe some of each has accidently made its way into the others bin. :P

What are the differing features, please? Some have lighter colours and others look too long or too wide to be that specific species, so I'd like to sort them out one way or the other.

Can/will they hybridise if left together?

Cheers!

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I do not think hybridization is possible based on the differences in male genitalia, though stranger things have happened...

As they grow you should be able to see obvious differences and be able to sort them before they are sexually mature, so no worries....

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Thanks for the reply, Matt, but I really have no idea on any differences and doubt my ability to separate them...! :P:(

Would you please mention a few differences, as I'd really like to pin this one down. Most of us roach keepers are working in the dark out here, and it's like the blind leading the blind! :lol:

Thanks, man.

Paul

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No, I have a complete colony, from tiny ones to huge lads, but I had a few escapees when they first arrived and possibly popped them into the wrong bins, (G. portentosa into E. chopardi, and vice versa) so I cannot simply take a sample from each tank and compare them, as I don't know if I buggered them up in the first place!! :o :o

Sad, I know, but I'd really like to get educated now.... :P

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Chopardi tend to be a little more flat with light orange stripes on the abdomen. With the normal hissers the nymphs tend to have a fuller shape and colors more in the red hue.

Thank you for the reply! :)

Can you easily tell them apart? Ergo, can I with practice?

So the G. portentosa are more tubular and the E. chopardi are flatter? Or only the nymphs?

Does length come into the equation at all?

My problem is that I would like to sort them into their correct bins, now, rather than later.

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  • 4 months later...
Thank you for the reply! :)

Can you easily tell them apart? Ergo, can I with practice?

Yeah, no problem

So the G. portentosa are more tubular and the E. chopardi are flatter? Or only the nymphs?

Nope - G. portentosa are the flatter ones and E. chopardi are noticably rounder. (Adults and nymphs)

Does length come into the equation at all?

Sure does! G. portentosa are a lot longer as well as a lot larger than their cave-dwelling pals... :P

My problem is that I would like to sort them into their correct bins, now, rather than later.

Quite understandable! Hope this helps a little! ;)

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