Jump to content

Diapheromera femorata


Ralph
 Share

Recommended Posts

From Elytra and Antenna and BugsinCyberspace I've learned they eat bramble, black cherry, rose, clover, oak, locust, apple, viburnum, and raspberry. :blink: Is there any complete list of foodplants for young and adults, and are all of these correct?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Ralph,

These are notoriously difficult to start as nymphs. Hatchlings are weak at best and most refuse to feed at all and wither away after a few days. Adults, especially males, accept many different foodplants if you can get them (or find them) at that stage.

I assume you've found a specimen or two. They are amazing bugs in terms of size and beautiful with their glossy, wooden coloration. Good luck with them if you get them and let me know if you learn anything. I would like to make an attempt with them again someday.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I read about your nymph experience, sounded pretty bad. Did you get any of those past the first molt? Anyway, I'm going somewhere where they are usually common, and am hoping to bring back a couple older nymphs or adults. A few years ago I've tried feeding them on willow and maple, neither of which worked. How long do these guys live as adults?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, I raised them through to maturity at least one generation, maybe twice. Once you get them to about 3rd instar they are fine, but that first instar experiences super massive losses.

Adult females might stretch out to six months in captivity. Males usually live shorter adult lives than females.

It's been many years since I've kept that particular species, so my memory is fading. Of the hundred plus species I made attempts with, they may have been the most frustrating because they are native and fairly widespread around the country and should be rather easy, theoretically. Usually, I suspect a breakthrough of some kind is possible with a difficult species, but these nymphs are just so spindly and weak and reluctant to feed. Their rarity in the hobby is a sign of their difficulty (though what phasmid isn't rare in the US anymore?).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...