Jump to content

Incubation Data for Several Livebearers


Zephyr
 Share

Recommended Posts

I've been taking data on several of my colonies to see which species produces babies first.

What I've done is separated out a bunch of subadults of several species of Blaberid and allowed them to mature together. I recorded the date that the first female matures on (and if there aren't males present already, the date that the first male matures) and then I eagerly await the first batch of babies. There will be a margin of error for all of these (since it assumes that the first set(s) of babies came from the first female(s) to mature) but they should be relatively accurate. All of the species are put in set-ups that, from my experience, are usually the most encouraging to reproduction (for example, Blaptica dubia has a very shallow layer of coconut fiber substrate, whereas Eublaberus posticus will have an accumulation of frass instead) All the roaches are offered the same diet; a dry food mixture and fruit/veggies once a week which is left in the container until the next cleaning. Some containers are being kept slightly warmer than others, and the temperatures will be given relatively (for example, the Blaberus discoidalis are being kept higher on my rack and thus warmer than the dubia or posticus.) Each container has a varying number of adults (I did not standardize the starting numbers out of personal preference.) I check the containers once a week so each data set is biased by this means of checking (although if I'm expecting something I will check once or twice over the course of the week.) Yet again, the data will not be 100% revealing as to reproductive trends, but it should provide some interesting insight. The idea is to get a glimpse of the rate of the reproductive cycle for each species, and not necessarily the sheer number of babies born. (The latter idea would require standardization of numbers, because obviously a container of any species with 20 adult females will produce more babies than one with 10.)

So far, the only complete data is as follows:

Blaberus discoidalis

First adult female observed: ~August 18, 2011. (Adult males were present before the female(s) matured)

First babies observed: ~November 18, 2011.

Days between female maturation and parturition: 92 days.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree, great project! I think it would be useful to post the temperatures (and humidity patterns if you vary that) with each species' data.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Just thought I'd add a little bit to this:

Blaberus discoidalis

First adult female observed: ~August 18, 2011. (Adult males were present before the female(s) matured)

First babies observed: ~November 18, 2011.

Days between female maturation and parturition: 92 days.

Approximate temperature: 78-84 degrees Fahrenheit (depending on season and time of day.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

More data!

Pycnoscelus surinamensis

First adult female observed: ~September 26th, 2011.

First babies observed: ~December 2nd, 2011.

Days between female maturation and parturition: 67 days.

Approximate temperature: 78-88 degrees Fahrenheit (depending on season and time of day; for about the first month after females began maturing the temperatures were on the higher end of the scale and they were later reduced)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lol, P. surinamensis. They get a head start!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

And more data! :)

Eublaberus posticus

First adult female observed: ~September 23rd, 2011. (Adult males were present before the female(s) matured)

First babies observed: December 25, 2011.

Days between female maturation and parturition: 93 days.

Approximate temperature: 75-82 degrees Fahrenheit (depending on season and time of day.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

This next set of data is very intriguing; it is evidence that Blaptica dubia appear to breed the slowest out of all the species studied so far, yet they are the most popular feeder. Though it cannot be said with certainty that they breed more slowly than discoids since those were kept at a higher temperature, it can be said with certainty that they breed more slowly than Eublaberus posticus as both were kept under the exact same temperature conditions.

Blaptica dubia

First adult female observed: ~September 23rd, 2011. (Adult males were not present until ~September 29th)

First babies observed: January 5th, 2012.

Days between female maturation and parturition: 104 days.

Approximate temperature: 75-82 degrees Fahrenheit (depending on season and time of day.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Blaberus parabolicus

First adult female observed: ~October 10, 2011. (Adult males were present before the female(s) matured)

First babies observed: ~February 4, 2012.

Days between female maturation and parturition: 117 days.

Approximate temperature: 75-88 degrees Fahrenheit (depending on season and time of day; during the daytime the temperatures are considerably high but they fall to the room's average temperature at night.)

This set of data is particularly interesting because even with higher temperatures, this supposedly fast-breeding species reproduced the slowest of all the species observed so far. It should be noted that I did cull several adult females from this batch, however, so if one of the culled females was the first or one of the first to mature, then this data may be a little off and the actual gestation period may be shorter.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This next set of data is very intriguing; it is evidence that Blaptica dubia appear to breed the slowest out of all the species studied so far, yet they are the most popular feeder. Though it cannot be said with certainty that they breed more slowly than discoids since those were kept at a higher temperature, it can be said with certainty that they breed more slowly than Eublaberus posticus as both were kept under the exact same temperature conditions.

Blaptica dubia

First adult female observed: ~September 23rd, 2011. (Adult males were not present until ~September 29th)

First babies observed: January 5th, 2012.

Days between female maturation and parturition: 104 days.

Approximate temperature: 75-82 degrees Fahrenheit (depending on season and time of day.)

My dubia nymphs are over 160 days old and most still have at least 2 instars to go, is this normal? They are all healthy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...