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Problem With Macropanesthia


Onagro
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Yesterday, I recieved a few of these guys, 2 nymphs and an adult female. The nymphs have been acting fine but the large female has only moved about an inch since her arrival. She hasn't tried to burrow or anything and the only reason I know she's alive is she raises her rear off the ground every so often. Does she have have some kind of shipping stress or is there another problem?

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Yesterday, I recieved a few of these guys, 2 nymphs and an adult female. The nymphs have been acting fine but the large female has only moved about an inch since her arrival. She hasn't tried to burrow or anything and the only reason I know she's alive is she raises her rear off the ground every so often. Does she have have some kind of shipping stress or is there another problem?

Based on your post, there could be one of several problems. There are a few questions I ask when I get something new. You will need to address these questions for a somewhat accurate diagnosis:

How is the enclosure set up?

What is the humidity?

What is the substrate moisture at (described?)

What is her body temp?

Enclosure temp?

What is available for food/water?

Do you see any tiny mites present?

Are all her limbs completely intact, or might one or two be missing the tarsus?

Are the antennae intact?

Is there a crack in her exoskeleton?

Are the spiracules clear or clogged?

What is her overall length and width?

Can you tell if the abdomen extends and retracts?

Full distended?

Not distended at all?

Are there any peculiar dark spots on the exoskeleton?

Can you photograph her rear off the ground for an approximation of this position?

Do the legs move when there is other bodily movement or do they remain fixed?

If you turn her over onto her back, what reaction does she have in the first 20-30 seconds?

Then what happens when set right side up?

How long was she in transit?

Describe thoroughly the shipping container as it appeared upon opening.

How familiar are you with the source of this specimen and its previous enclosure?

How long has she been in your care?

How long has this behaviour occurred?

Print these out and write out your answers so that you can type them back in a reply copy of this post, and the collective members of this forum can assess the issue at hand. I apologize for not numbering as I went, which would have made reference easier.

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Based on your post, there could be one of several problems. There are a few questions I ask when I get something new. You will need to address these questions for a somewhat accurate diagnosis:

How is the enclosure set up?

What is the humidity?

What is the substrate moisture at (described?)

What is her body temp?

Enclosure temp?

What is available for food/water?

Do you see any tiny mites present?

Are all her limbs completely intact, or might one or two be missing the tarsus?

Are the antennae intact?

Is there a crack in her exoskeleton?

Are the spiracules clear or clogged?

What is her overall length and width?

Can you tell if the abdomen extends and retracts?

Full distended?

Not distended at all?

Are there any peculiar dark spots on the exoskeleton?

Can you photograph her rear off the ground for an approximation of this position?

Do the legs move when there is other bodily movement or do they remain fixed?

If you turn her over onto her back, what reaction does she have in the first 20-30 seconds?

Then what happens when set right side up?

How long was she in transit?

Describe thoroughly the shipping container as it appeared upon opening.

How familiar are you with the source of this specimen and its previous enclosure?

How long has she been in your care?

How long has this behaviour occurred?

Print these out and write out your answers so that you can type them back in a reply copy of this post, and the collective members of this forum can assess the issue at hand. I apologize for not numbering as I went, which would have made reference easier.

I hate to say this but this morning, the large female died. When I found her, her underside was covered in white mites and what may be mite eggs. I'm disappointed but at least the nymphs are fine. However, I will sanitize the adult's aquarium and dispose of the leaf litter in it. Thanks for your help.

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I hate to say this but this morning, the large female died. When I found her, her underside was covered in white mites and what may be mite eggs. I'm disappointed but at least the nymphs are fine. However, I will sanitize the adult's aquarium and dispose of the leaf litter in it. Thanks for your help.

It is difficult to say if she had mites on the way in, or if the mites were attracted to her corpse and climbed on. Either way, I would remove the other two and really clean out the container, add new substrate, and replace the two living ones just in case. Good husbandry practice should help make sure the two live ones remain in good health.

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