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Identifying nymphs


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Posted by Nike on 12/29/2005, 10:01 am

137.163.145.226

I found a dirty little tank from a local petshop,with some nymphs in it. I bought them and took them home. There`s 15 of them,but none of them are adults,the biggest nymphs are about a little under 3 inches long. I`ve been looking through roach pics on the net,but I really can`t say if it`s Discoidales,Giganteus or Fusca; is it possible to find any identifying charasteristics between these before they mature?

nike@elvis.com

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Posted by Dave on 12/30/2005, 12:42 am, in reply to "Identifying nymphs"

68.186.122.2

I just looked over my roaches after looking at your photo's and I have to say, it's hard to tell the difference between fusca,giants and hybrid nymphs. But I'm sure they aren't discoidalis.

davegrimm1@yahoo.com

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Posted by Nike on 12/31/2005, 11:08 am, in reply to "Re: Identifying nymphs"

195.148.188.90

One more question; I could have some more roaches,they are certified Giganteus`. If I put them together with these "mystery"-roaches of mine,and even if they would then show themselves to be Fusca or a hybrid,what would it mean for my colony?

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Posted by John J Starr Jr on 1/3/2006, 7:15 am, in reply to "Identifying nymphs"

4.254.218.20

It is very tough to tell the species name especially of the Blaberus genus when you are comparing nymphs. I have noticed that even within the same exact species in a single colony that both the wider, more rounded, and flatter nymphs exist right along with the narrow, more oblong, and taller nymphs.

I am not sure as of yet but I do believe that this wide, rounded, and flat nymph is either one of of the instar stages or it may even be a gender indiction. I will spend more time on this issue in the upcoming months.

A three inch long nymph is HUGE in comparison to some of the Blaberus roach nymphs and I would guess if you are saying that it is a Blaberus for sure then it must be a fusca or a giganteus. Look for the black band after an adult presents itself.

John J Starr Jr

johnstarr@demasoni.com

Link: http://www.angelfire.com/wy2/raisingexoticroaches

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Posted by Nike on 1/3/2006, 1:14 am, in reply to "Re: Identifying nymphs"

213.169.24.48

I got the 50+ Giganteus yesterday,and I didn`t put them together with the old stock,because although they look very similar,there are differences as well. The old ones have a rounder appearance,where as the Giganteus are flatter. I`ll just have to wait and see. I have the both colonies now in about +30 degrees Celsius,I hope it speeds their growth up. Also,the Giganteus stock is inbred at least for ten years,so I`ll have to get some new blood when the spring comes.

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