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Hissers Know Keeper


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This might sound crazy but i think cockroaches are more intelligent that a lot of people might realise.

I've only kept my colony (mainly as pets except odd ones for Pacman frog now and again)

just under 2 years and i can take any of them out on my hands and they will sit there quite peaceful, its like they can recognise

you. Anyone else noticed similar ?

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Habituation of hissing by Madagascar hissing cockroaches (Gromphadorhina portentosa): evidence of discrimination between humans?

Abstract

Anecdotal reports suggest that insects can be “tamed” with frequent human contact. In the present experiment, repeated handling of Madagascar hissing cockroaches by the same person resulted in habituation of the hissing response in ten of 12 subjects. These subjects were then handled by a novel person in order to determine whether habituation might be specific to a particular human. Four of ten “habituated” subjects immediately began to hiss in the presence of the novel handler, but again ceased hissing when contact with the familiar person was reestablished. Our results suggest that in some cases “taming” may be person-specific, rather than a generalized response to humans. These preliminary findings are the first evidence of discrimination between humans by an insect species, although comparable results are well documented in mammals and birds.

http://www.sciencedi...376635704001688

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Habituation of hissing by Madagascar hissing cockroaches (Gromphadorhina portentosa): evidence of discrimination between humans?

Abstract

Anecdotal reports suggest that insects can be “tamed” with frequent human contact. In the present experiment, repeated handling of Madagascar hissing cockroaches by the same person resulted in habituation of the hissing response in ten of 12 subjects. These subjects were then handled by a novel person in order to determine whether habituation might be specific to a particular human. Four of ten “habituated” subjects immediately began to hiss in the presence of the novel handler, but again ceased hissing when contact with the familiar person was reestablished. Our results suggest that in some cases “taming” may be person-specific, rather than a generalized response to humans. These preliminary findings are the first evidence of discrimination between humans by an insect species, although comparable results are well documented in mammals and birds.

http://www.sciencedi...376635704001688

Many thanks for that link, i was sure i wasnt just imagining them getting tame.

Mine very rarely hiss too.

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Although I haven't observed this behavior in my own Roaches I know this happens in insects that are sociable. My honeybees barely react to my presence but thoroughly investigate anyone else near my Hive. Although cockroaches do not need to be kept in "colonies" they are social to some degree, so I'd imagine this can happen from repeated exposure.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Mr. Crackerpants, that's an interesting read! A bit of corroboration for something I've been telling people I think is true.

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