Jump to content

Vaejovis carolinianus parthenogenics?


RomanBuck
 Share

Recommended Posts

I am not sure if it was parthenogenesis or if the female mated. I got her as an adult way back in September so I am not sure if she retained (or if it is even possible for a scorpion to retain it that long) the sperm until now or what. Got any ideas?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There are some species in that family that display parthenogenesis but I'm not sure about V. carolinensis. Scorpions can retain sperm for quite a while though, so I wouldn't be super surprised.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey Roman,

I seen your post and wanted to do some digging and I came across a rather interesting paper written in 2002 that showed the gestation period for a select list of scorpions and wouldn't you know it I found the Vaejovis Carolinianus on it, apparently, their gestation period, or as they described as "Embryonic Development" period ranges from 12-13 months! The paper also made mention of the possibility of the evolution of parthenogenises due to environmental influence but made no mention of the Vaejovis Carolinianus.They did say however, that no less than 8 species of Scorpion are known to be Parthenogenetic, none of which originate from N.America. Hope this helps. The paper was written in 2002, so more may have been learned in this time since, however, even they referenced to papers and observations made in the 50's and 60's lol

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey Roman,

I seen your post and wanted to do some digging and I came across a rather interesting paper written in 2002 that showed the gestation period for a select list of scorpions and wouldn't you know it I found the Vaejovis Carolinianus on it, apparently, their gestation period, or as they described as "Embryonic Development" period ranges from 12-13 months! The paper also made mention of the possibility of the evolution of parthenogenises due to environmental influence but made no mention of the Vaejovis Carolinianus.They did say however, that no less than 8 species of Scorpion are known to be Parthenogenetic, none of which originate from N.America. Hope this helps. The paper was written in 2002, so more may have been learned in this time since, however, even they referenced to papers and observations made in the 50's and 60's lol

Thanks! My friend was a little worried because she just kept getting bigger and bigger. He thought she might explode at any moment! Turns out she did with babies lol.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah that's kind of how I ended up with my Heterometrus... Guy bought her as a "large" adult that "liked to eat" next thing you know, babies lol so I've been helping him raise the new norms but I know there is much more I've yet to find out which also brought me here

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...