Jump to content

Pycnoscelus surinamensis colony.


Recommended Posts

Well I have absolutely no idea what this guy is... :P none whatsoever. 

IMG_20170601_231620.jpg

Found it in less than five minutes, had to drop it in the pool to ensure it's capture.

IMG_20170601_231658.jpg

 

Now I just need two more, and the mascot collection will be completed.

 

@Hisserdude

Link to comment
Share on other sites

59 minutes ago, Tleilaxu said:

Well I have absolutely no idea what this guy is... :P none whatsoever. 

 

Found it in less than five minutes, had to drop it in the pool to ensure it's capture.

 

 

Now I just need two more, and the mascot collection will be completed.

 

@Hisserdude

Nice, you got a aussie nymph! :D Hope it does well for you, seems a lot healthier than the last one!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nice, glad they are getting more active for you! :) Mine are always making tunnels against the bottom of the enclosure, that's where all the action is at. ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm sure it's temporary, but she does have a burrow and tunnel system, though I'm not seeing any associated territorial tendacies with a permanent burrow so I'm assuming she just likes the area well enough that it's well worn.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, WarrenB said:

Great sequence of pics.

Do they actually construct burrows, then? As opposed to just pushing their way through litter and topsoil?

Not permanent burrows, no, but while pushing through the substrate they do leave lots of tunnels behind them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well added a bit more material for the egg laying roaches to have a slim chance of avoiding the ravenous Surinames.

IMG_20170608_144819.jpg

One of Surinames was already inspecting it however, this nymph maybe as large or larger than the adults.

 

IMG_20170608_144908.jpg

The female American and Australian roaches will have to be smart.

IMG_20170608_144800.jpg

Edited by Tleilaxu
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Very cool! From what little I've read you've caught most (if not all of these) yourself? I've just started taking a liking to my native species of inverts here in Arkansas, I used to go field herping a ton since my region has some of the coolest salamanders in the country! (IMO)

 

I would love to go and find some native roach species like you did, but I'm not really sure where to start though...

 

What species can I expect to find in my area? Is there a better time of day/year to look for them? (I'm assuming nighttime would be best.) And where should look? Sewers and storm drains? Wooded areas? Fields? Maybe even a creek or lake shore? You live in florida correct? I bet you have several cool species due to the environment over there!

 

Oh, one last thing are there any laws or restrictions for keeping native (or non-native) species in the states?

 

Thanks so much! - Joshua

Link to comment
Share on other sites

24 minutes ago, Dubia4Life said:

Very cool! From what little I've read you've caught most (if not all of these) yourself? I've just started taking a liking to my native species of inverts here in Arkansas, I used to go field herping a ton since my region has some of the coolest salamanders in the country! (IMO)

 

I would love to go and find some native roach species like you did, but I'm not really sure where to start though...

 

What species can I expect to find in my area? Is there a better time of day/year to look for them? (I'm assuming nighttime would be best.) And where should look? Sewers and storm drains? Wooded areas? Fields? Maybe even a creek or lake shore? You live in florida correct? I bet you have several cool species due to the environment over there!

 

Oh, one last thing are there any laws or restrictions for keeping native (or non-native) species in the states?

 

Thanks so much! - Joshua

Yes I've caught them all.(My roaches that is, not all species)

As for Legal regulations the only ones I'm aware of is your not allowed to ship roaches into Florida or Tennessee.

You have a few choices, you can find various wood roaches, (Parcoblatta) a few Periplaneta species and maybe a few others. @Hisserdude Pycnoscelus surinamensis also lives down there.

I look for them under various leaves, loose large rocks/logs, coconuts are a popular hide down here. You've also mentioned some nice spots, but I'd never go looking in sewers. :P Day and night work well, I've personally had better luck at night, but you can find them resting during the day. Warm (hot)humid days/nights are best.

I personally never thought I'd like Periplaneta anericanus, it being a pest, but putting in the hard work to catch them causes them to grow on you. :)

Edited by Tleilaxu
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, Tleilaxu said:

As for Legal regulations the only ones I'm aware of is your not allowed to ship roaches into Florida or Tennessee.

Actually, it's only FL, pretty sure it's legal to ship roaches to TN now. :)

5 hours ago, Dubia4Life said:

What species can I expect to find in my area? Is there a better time of day/year to look for them? (I'm assuming nighttime would be best.) And where should look? Sewers and storm drains? Wooded areas? Fields? Maybe even a creek or lake shore? 

In Arkansas you can find several Parcoblatta species, (P.pennsylvanica, P.uhleriana, and P.virginica for example), Pseudomops septentrionalis, and Ischnoptera deropeltiformis. That's all I could find for native roaches in your state, not a bad selection if I do say so myself! :)

Most of those species would be found under rocks, leaf litter, bark, and other objects on the ground in wooded areas or fields. P.septentrionalis nymphs could also be found that way, but look for adults on flowers during the day. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Very cool! Thanks guys! I decided to take a look in a few piles of leaf litter and other than a few very small beetles and some earth worms I didn't find much... but I did come across a fairly big bug that looked like some sort of wood roach but man- it was one speedy little guy. I was satisfied with that one find even though I didn't catch it because now I know they live in my area, specifically my backyard lol

 

I didn't mean to derail your thread, sorry bout that lol. I have to leave town and go to mountain view AR for a knife making class for a few days, but when I get back home I will check under every rock/log in my yard... in other words I think I'm hooked!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 minutes ago, Tleilaxu said:

Placing dog food in areas where you think there maybe roaches helps as well, I check locations hourly or so, they seem to not mind disturbance as much, especially if food is in the area.

Really? That's pretty smart, I'll have to try that. Any other baiting tips or tricks? Lol, thanks man

Link to comment
Share on other sites

@Tleilaxu Congrats, glad you got even more P.australasiae! :D

That Surinam nymph is probably going to molt soon, either that, or it just had a big meal. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Tleilaxu said:

Nothing tonight, but some burrowers...

@Hisserdude Anything in particular that I should do for the female?

You mean for the fat surinam? No, just let nature take it's course, she should molt just fine with no special attention. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well the ooth got eaten, likely by the Surinames, but I'm not ruling out the possiblity of other roach suspects. I've let the American roaches all go, now that I'm catching Australian roaches in regular intervals. They(The Americans) seem to bully them(The Australians) around.

They certainly a charismatic species. The Australian roach seems more reserved. Although that may change as they mature.

IMG_20170613_223152_zpsvrgbgnif.jpg

IMG_20170614_160906_zpsehfwwc0k.jpg

That is my newest addition, it's darker than the others.

Here is four of the five Australian roaches. Number five can hide in the burrows of the Surinames.

IMG_20170614_160801_zpsgrzt2yl2.jpg

Edited by Tleilaxu
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

23 minutes ago, Tleilaxu said:

Well the ooth got eaten, likely by the Surinames, but I'm not ruling out the possiblity of other roach suspects. I've let the American roaches all go, now that I'm catching Australian roaches in regular intervals. They seem to bully them around. They certainly a charismatic species. The Australian roach seems more reserved. Although that may change as they mature.

IMG_20170613_223152_zpsvrgbgnif.jpg

IMG_20170614_160906_zpsehfwwc0k.jpg

That is my newest addition, it's darker than the others.

Here is four of the five Australian roaches. Number five can hide in the burrows of the Surinames.

IMG_20170614_160801_zpsgrzt2yl2.jpg

Very cool! How big are your enclosures? I would imagine you need a barrier to keep them from climbing out right?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's a gallon jug, it used to hold cheese balls. And for some bizarre reason they cannot climb this plastic very well, yet have no problem scaling other types of plastic.

IMG_20170614_170003_zpsvbi5nakp.jpg

IMG_20170614_165548_zpsnxgvli9r.jpg

I've changed thing around to try and make more suitable, and safer sites for ooth production.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Tleilaxu said:

@Hisserdude

Here is one of the "giant form" Surinames, I managed to catch one.

Compared to an American Roach nymph.

Yeah, just a big female, they can be pretty variable in size. Have some similarly sized individuals in my culture! :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

36 minutes ago, Hisserdude said:

Yeah, just a big female, they can be pretty variable in size. Have some similarly sized individuals in my culture! :)

I suppose through selective "cloning" you probably could fix that trait....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, Tleilaxu said:

I suppose through selective "cloning" you probably could fix that trait....

Yeah, you probably could.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...