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Elliptorhina and my other Gromphadorhini


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Because I was away for a long time, many of my laboratory cultures fell into disrepair and now I have to resurrect them.

Everyone suffered. In about two months, there are already positive results.

Elliptorhina chopardi

About 90% of the population has disappeared, but now, active restoration has begun, a lot of nymphs have already appeared, they are growing rapidly and the birth of new ones continues. There is no anxiety.

Elliptorhina javanica

In this population, almost all nymphs died out, with the exception of the oldest ages. Imago about 30 individuals. Adult nymphs continue to emerge into adults. There is no brood yet, but the population is not deficient in both males and females.

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Fig. 1. Elliptorhina javanica, adult female.

Elliptorhina laevigata

The situation was the same as in the previous species, but now there are already many nymphs of all vorastas and they continue to be born. The population is large and strong. There is no cause for concern.

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Fig. 2. Elliptorhina laevigata, adult female.

Elliptorhina coquereliana

Unfortunately, all individuals died, leaving no offspring. But three weeks ago I again received 14 juvenile nymphs, of which several will soon become adults. The view is difficult, but I am sure that I will succeed, the arrived individuals are enough for a good start. Nymphs grow very quickly (of course, in the laboratory it is 35°C) and feed actively.

Elliptorhina davidi

Initially, there was a mass death, including adults and nymphs of all ages. But gradually the situation stabilized and the case was at first single, and then completely stopped. Now there are at least 10 adult females in the population, about the same number of males and more than a dozen nymphs of different ages. All adults actively mate, and one of the females was recently seen with an ootheca. For this species, as always, there is a very strong concern, but I hope for success, the culture lasted for me for a relatively long time, although there were unpleasant moments. In general, we are waiting for the females to start giving birth to babies.

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Fig's. 3—5. Elliptorhina davidi

Gromphadorhina spp.

G. portentosa ('normal' and 'black') perform best. Their environment is stable, and the populations are relatively numerous. Recently, after a long break, very strong brood appeared in the population of G. oblongonota, all nymphs are very large and have already begun to molt at the second age. The situation is worst in the population of G. cf. grandidieri ("Gromphadorhina sp."), but recently, one of the females has been seen with ootheca. The culture is a big concern, but everything should work out, since I have already successfully bred them.

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Fig. 6. G. portentosa, adult male.

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Fig. 7. G. cf. grandidieri, adult male.

Princisia

In the population of P. vanwaerebeki 'Big', everything is not bad, the process of reproduction is actively going on, more and more new nymphs are born. P. vanwaerebeki 'Normal' has a strong population but relatively few adult females. There are no new babies yet, but I'm sure they will appear soon. The population of P. vanwaerebeki 'Black&White' also has enough individuals, in addition, more and more new babies are born.

Aeluropoda insignis

The population was in an oppressed state, all the nymphs disappeared, with the exception of the oldest ones. Now, active reproduction has begun and there are already a lot of junior and medium nymphs. In general, there is nothing to worry about.

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Sorry to hear that your cultures went through a rough phase, but I hope they'll all bounce back! I REALLY want Elliptorhina coquereliana one day, I hope yours breed this time!

 

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1 hour ago, Hisserdude said:

Sorry to hear that your cultures went through a rough phase, but I hope they'll all bounce back!

Thanks a lot :)

1 hour ago, Hisserdude said:

I hope yours breed this time!

We will try :)

P. S. By the way, have you managed to propagate Elliptorhina davidi?

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9 minutes ago, Gromphadorhini said:

Thanks a lot :)

We will try :)

P. S. By the way, have you managed to propagate Elliptorhina davidi?

I've not, no, I failed to give my pair adequate ventilation for breeding. 😕 But I've got friends here in the US who have healthy cultures of davidi.

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1 minute ago, Hisserdude said:

I've not, no, I failed to give my pair adequate ventilation for breeding. 😕 But I've got friends here in the US who have healthy cultures of davidi.

I have noticed that this species (and all others too) thrive best in absolute ventilation and complete dryness, combined with elevated temperatures. Then the deaths stop and they become very active and active (they want to multiply very much) and eat and run a lot.

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7 hours ago, Gromphadorhini said:

I have noticed that this species (and all others too) thrive best in absolute ventilation and complete dryness, combined with elevated temperatures. Then the deaths stop and they become very active and active (they want to multiply very much) and eat and run a lot.

Yes, this is definitely the case with davidi, and I now know all hissers enjoy very high ventilation. I will say though, in terms of humidity, Princisia in particular seems to like it more humid than most other hissers. I keep them on a 50/50 humidity gradient with good success, if they're kept too dry I've noticed a high mortality rate in smaller nymphs.

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19 minutes ago, Hisserdude said:

Yes, this is definitely the case with davidi, and I now know all hissers enjoy very high ventilation. I will say though, in terms of humidity, Princisia in particular seems to like it more humid than most other hissers. I keep them on a 50/50 humidity gradient with good success, if they're kept too dry I've noticed a high mortality rate in smaller nymphs.

It is interesting. However, I do very well with them, the nymphs do not die, although my humidity is extremely low (this is the case for all Oxyhaloinae in the laboratory).

As an off-topic: my former population of Henschoutedenia flexivitta categorically refused to breed in dry conditions and individuals simply lived out their lives and died of old age. So it was with other keepers who maintained this line (it seemed to be from Belgium or Austria?). As soon as they began to abundantly moisten the substrate and maintain moisture, they immediately began to multiply. However, my current population, which I acquired here in St. Petersburg, is kept in typical "Oxygaloin" dry conditions and breeds well. Here is such an interesting story. Moreover, I studied the morphology completely of both samples from these two lines and they are identical :)

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