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I don't keep D.granti any longer because the amount of time and energy they require to rear to adulthood is excessive compared to the adult lifespan and they're similar to D.tityus which doesn't have that issue. D.granti is a pretty cool beetle though. The chance of picking up captive bred adults is very close to zero (at this time of year even less) but this should be about the perfect time to pick up small grubs if you keep an eye out. F1 grubs hatch Nov.-Jan. normally. F2 or greater can start to get out of sync with the natural seasons but chances of picking up anything beyond F1 is slim to none.

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I don't keep D.granti any longer because the amount of time and energy they require to rear to adulthood is excessive compared to the adult lifespan and they're similar to D.tityus which doesn't have that issue. D.granti is a pretty cool beetle though. The chance of picking up captive bred adults is very close to zero (at this time of year even less) but this should be about the perfect time to pick up small grubs if you keep an eye out. F1 grubs hatch Nov.-Jan. normally. F2 or greater can start to get out of sync with the natural seasons but chances of picking up anything beyond F1 is slim to none.

Yeah thats what I thought about this beetle when I researched it. tityus is cool enough as it is and there are those triceritops beetles that can live for a year.

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Where would the F1 stage be found? Under a rotten log? Deep in the soil? Under a stone?

:blink:

I had considered explaining that. F1 is the reference to the generation, not an instar or stage. First is wild, then the offspring are F1 (F1 go through egg, larva, pupa and adult stages). The offspring of F1 are F2 and so on. F1 would begin with eggs that hatch from wild females and Dec.-Jan. is the normal time for hatching. If they are kept for multiple generations indoors the natural cycles get out of sync so you could have eggs hatching any time of year. However, since this species is rarely kept for multiple generations chances of finding someone with grubs at a different stage (other than one-year-old third instar grubs --AKA L3-- from the previous year which would be more expensive and an uncommon find) is unlikely.
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Arizona = D.granti

Texas = D.tityus

Thanks Orin! Hoping I find some- planning to go to east Texas next month-ish and see what is in/around/under some wooded areas.

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