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Are these both B. Dubia?


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The first roaches I got were from questionable sources, so I would like to make sure that they are what I was told they are. I noticed some differences in the adult males when I was moving them over to a bigger enclosure a few days ago, and I've been trying to confirm with photos on the net but it's a bit hard as I'm still learning what to look for. The adult females all seem to be the same aside from size - some are half the length of the others, and of course some are striped and some are nearly solid black, but that variation seems to be the norm. Not sure about the differences in size though.

With these two though I was curious. The first has white edging and two white dashes on the head, while the other has darker orange edging and orange spots on the head. I have one more that looks like the first and two others that look like the second. Please forgive the bad photos - they were barely cooperating and I had to fetch them back after they glided across the room a couple of times.

maleroach1.jpg

maleraoch2.jpg

Thanks for any guidance!

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No, both of the lighter ones have been that color for at least a month. I only have five adult males at the moment so it's been easy to keep track of them. :) My first thought was them being lighter from molting, too.

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Termite thay are the same species that color variance is pretty common I actually have quite a few males that look like that. That being said as long as two different species can't inter breed and thay come from similar envoments there usally isn't much harm with having them in the same container. Though there is always the chance that one species will out compeat or out breed the other species

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That is what I say, that eventually if they are going after the same food, and occupying the same environmental niche, entomological science says they will compete and the stronger will eventually win out. That is assuming they are two different species and unable to cross breed. Color variations are not two different species. Even with the birds that are commonly called Sparrows, there are several distinct species that occupy the same area, but they do not compete and they breed true. (See Gambels, and White Crowned Sparrows for example).

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  • 3 weeks later...

That is what I say, that eventually if they are going after the same food, and occupying the same environmental niche, entomological science says they will compete and the stronger will eventually win out. That is assuming they are two different species and unable to cross breed. Color variations are not two different species. Even with the birds that are commonly called Sparrows, there are several distinct species that occupy the same area, but they do not compete and they breed true. (See Gambels, and White Crowned Sparrows for example).

Okay, here comes a little bit off. What about the madagascarian hisser species? I heard that all hisser species are living in Madagascar. Is their niche crossing each other? Are they living in same area?

I know it's not the right topic, but I didn't start it. :D

Zoltan

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