Jump to content

Marava pulchella


Cariblatta lutea
 Share

Recommended Posts

Tiny earwigs from AL (~ 0.25"). They are easy to breed and seem to get along well with larger species of roaches (i.e. Blaberus).

Neat thing about this species is that they come in brachypterous and macropterous form. You can see the difference between the two in the pics below (ones with yellow spots are macropterous specimens).

PS. They are up for trade ;)

15401008_1361140327281412_55936332572053

15492212_1361140353948076_75198496695690

15420979_1361140410614737_57029522871667

15337408_1361140407281404_26084113192018

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cute little guys, earwigs are one group of insect that I find is very underappreciated in the hobby, especially considering the amazing maternal care female earwigs have for their offspring. :) Thanks for sharing pics of this cool little species!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Hisserdude said:

Cute little guys, earwigs are one group of insect that I find is very underappreciated in the hobby, especially considering the amazing maternal care female earwigs have for their offspring. :) Thanks for sharing pics of this cool little species!

Indeed! There's quite a diversity and some are really pretty yet not many people give much thoughts on these guys :( Hopefully more people will begin to appreciate them when I start spreading some of the native species :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 minutes ago, Salmonsaladsandwich said:

Hmm, next time I'm near the seashore I'll have to collect some of those predatory maritime earwigs and see if I can breed those.

I tried keeping those and failed. Apparently they are highly cannibalistic as I had females lay eggs on multiple occasion and even saw babies, but they always disappeared within months. So I kept 4 nymphs separate from each other and they all grew fine (until I forgot to mist them -_- )

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love my earwigs I keep them in a large glass jar and they make tunnels like ants. I have only fed them dead roaches for 6 months and the colony still grows. What are some other good foods for them? Mine are ring legged earwigs maybe we can trade earwigs when the weather gets better. So how are yours with climbing? Mine climb anything except glass. Also mine out compete roaches and I think mine could over power a small roach. I'm overly cautious about that kinda thing though. I'm looking forward to see what other earwigs you bring to the hobby. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hadn't thought of keeping earwigs before. Might be something to try with the ones here once the weather warms up again. I think we mainly have the European species, but hey, gotta start somewhere, right?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I found some larger ones (the size of a large carpenter ant) here in Kentucky living in a smoke detector in a treehouse . Wish I had kept a few instead of spraying them for the customer. Sometimes people overreact to insects, but when your the exterminator.....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

20 hours ago, lovebugfarm said:

I love my earwigs I keep them in a large glass jar and they make tunnels like ants. I have only fed them dead roaches for 6 months and the colony still grows. What are some other good foods for them? Mine are ring legged earwigs maybe we can trade earwigs when the weather gets better. So how are yours with climbing? Mine climb anything except glass. Also mine out compete roaches and I think mine could over power a small roach. I'm overly cautious about that kinda thing though. I'm looking forward to see what other earwigs you bring to the hobby. :)

I use dog food and they seem to like it. Mine can't climb smooth surface like yours. I find ring legs in my backyard by the way. lol 

I also keep larger species of Euborellia that gets to about an inch in length. So far they've been prolific so I'm hoping to have them available as well

11 hours ago, pannaking22 said:

Hadn't thought of keeping earwigs before. Might be something to try with the ones here once the weather warms up again. I think we mainly have the European species, but hey, gotta start somewhere, right?

Give it a shot! They are pretty much roaches with forceps. LOL 

3 hours ago, Matttoadman said:

I found some larger ones (the size of a large carpenter ant) here in Kentucky living in a smoke detector in a treehouse . Wish I had kept a few instead of spraying them for the customer. Sometimes people overreact to insects, but when your the exterminator.....

That's sad :( I wonder what species they were 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah the ring legged are pretty common. What do you think about their potential as a feeder? The baby's are super small great size for slings im a lil worried about them trying to eat slings though or burrowing and not getting eaten right away. I figure I have a lot of earwigs and until people are interested in them I should find a use for them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I will now keep an eye out for more. I found them in the winter last year. I am guessing they chose it as a place to go dormant. It was 10ft off the ground so kind of strange for a leaf litter critter. Probably 15 or so curled inside.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, lovebugfarm said:

Yeah the ring legged are pretty common. What do you think about their potential as a feeder? The baby's are super small great size for slings im a lil worried about them trying to eat slings though or burrowing and not getting eaten right away. I figure I have a lot of earwigs and until people are interested in them I should find a use for them.

I personally don't use them as feeders because one time I gave a ring leg to my Zelus janus male and saw it eating the earwig. Few hours later when I checked on him he was dead :(

2 hours ago, Matttoadman said:

I will now keep an eye out for more. I found them in the winter last year. I am guessing they chose it as a place to go dormant. It was 10ft off the ground so kind of strange for a leaf litter critter. Probably 15 or so curled inside.

Sounds like they may have been Forticula auricularia 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...