Jump to content

I'm glad to have found you guys!


crepsis
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi, my name's Chris. I recently was given a baby Woodhouse toad, Toady, and have had a Double Yellowheaded Amazon parrot, Panamamaru (his nickname after watching way too much Inuyasha), for about 12 years. I've been doing a lot of research on crickets (as feeders for Toady), and I am currently attempting to culture "wild crafted" *ha!* Gryllus veletus - the black spring field cricket. That's how I ran across roaches as feeders - and the benefits of not having stinky, noisy crickets around, something I realized I may have to deal with should I be successful with my ongoing cricket adventure. (You know, that last sack of Acheta crickets from the pet store almost made me gag!)

I have always been totally fascinated with the sciences, mainly life sciences, genetics, and (almost) any sort of animal (and plant!) husbandry. So naturally, the more and more I read about keeping roaches as feeders for other animals, and now as fascinating and beautiful pets in their own right, the more I find myself coming to the conclusion that I have to start a colony. (No, no, there's nothing you can say to sway my mind, it's made up!)

The species that I have decided to start this adventure with is Blaberus craniifer. Why, you ask? It's elementary: they don't fly, so they won't fly out of the vivarium that I set up for them, nor will they be able to climb the glass, which is a great bonus, and since they are tropical, they will not be able to live and breed without the proper environment, should they escape (escpecially good traits for a starter species for an insect I have almost no experience with - My experience lies in hearing societal stigma against roaches, and the fact that I once saw a bunch of tiny roaches in this guy's bathroom in Minneapolis, about 1/2 an inch long, and back then I thought that was really gross). Since this is a typically slower breeding species (from what I've read), this would be ideal for me, since I am mainly interested in starting and keeping the culture, rather than using them as feeders (at least initially, if I get overpopulated, then I'll see if Toady likes 'em). I think that this species is about the most eye-catching, and nice-looking of any of the ones out there, and I look forward to observing and experiencing them first hand.

So, that being said, that's pretty much why I'm here, I'm looking for more information to start, and a couple weeks to a month down the road, I'll most likely be looking to aqcuire some true Blaberus craniifer. So I'd certainly be happy to hear from anyone with advice and anyone who has true craniifer cultures (or knows where they can be purchased). When I get around to acquiring them I will probably be looking for craniifers that preferably have never been hybridized at all (if that's even possible, from what I've read most all of the lines in the US have been at one point or another), and maybe also craniifers from a couple different lines, so I start with a good, strong genetic base.

Looking forward to it...

Nice to meet ya!

PS One question that has just come to mind that I have been wondering for a while now - Are roach populations subject to any type of deleterius effects resulting from inbreeding depression, and if so, what do they tend to be?

Bcraniifer2.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Welcome to the forum, we're glad you found us! There are plenty of pure B.craniifer out there (hybrids tend to lose the Death's Head coloration) but you certainly have to be careful about where you get them from. If they're really cheap that's a warning sign. I would recommend against trying to obtain multiple lines, just one good one. They all came from the same stock to begin with and obtainintg multiple lines would only increase your chances of getting the wrong thing.

Cockroaches do not suffer from the inbreeding problems that say, a chameleon, would. You can keep a culture going at least 30 years without any trouble but still would want to remove deformities and runts whenever possible.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Welcome to the forum, we're glad you found us! There are plenty of pure B.craniifer out there (hybrids tend to lose the Death's Head coloration) but you certainly have to be careful about where you get them from. If they're really cheap that's a warning sign. I would recommend against trying to obtain multiple lines, just one good one. They all came from the same stock to begin with and obtainintg multiple lines would only increase your chances of getting the wrong thing.

Cockroaches do not suffer from the inbreeding problems that say, a chameleon, would. You can keep a culture going at least 30 years without any trouble but still would want to remove deformities and runts whenever possible.

Thanks for the info! That was the main thing that I was afraid of with getting two or more different lines, the risk of contaminating a good line with one that may have inadvertantly been hybridized, if people with experience think it's ok, then it's fine to start out with craniifers from just one line, then that's even better for me - less shipping charges! Plus it won't really make any difference one way or the other since all the lines came from one original line anyway...

Well thanks again, I'm looking forward to reading more all about them on here.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...