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what can you tell me about Blaberus giganteus?


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Hello, I am new to roaches and would like to know more about blaberus giganteus other than what I have already read about them from someone maybe who has kept some? I have the common hissers and now just aquired some small blaberus nymphs.I already know the general things such as they are the largest specie kept, both sexes have wings, they need a tall tank with branches for molting,and they live about a year.Any more info would be greatly appreciated especially what they like to eat and breeding.

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This can be a tricky species. A tall tank is not necessary, however, for subadults to molt to adulthood you will need to have molting platforms about 6"x6" to allow them to drop their wings. Even in a nearly perfect enclosure, you will have adults die off randomly after molting. I've been told they need wood to thrive, so mine have plenty of cypress mulch in their substrate. They like things cooler; 67-77 degrees is fine for them. Mine eat a wide variety of things but especially love banana. If you keep them dark and provide a good substrate you will have babies in no time.

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I was also really wanting to keep this species, however after reading more about them and talking with other keepers of them I'm not sure I want to spend that kind of money on them. The unexplained die-offs after molitng kinda makes me hesitant in spending the money on some. Instead I have been looking into the Blaberus fusca and Archimandrita tesselata. I'm still really interested in the giganteus, I will probably end up getting a few anyway and seeing how they do. I was not aware of them liking the cooler temps, interesting.

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Although there are plenty of alternatives to B. giganteus with A. tesselata probably being the closest one size-wise, once you see them side by side you realize hands down just how gigantic they are. lol

B. fusca, B. colloseus, B. "peruvianus", and some of the black wing strains of B. craniifer are also pretty hefty, but as I said, they're all dwarfed by giganteus.

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Although there are plenty of alternatives to B. giganteus with A. tesselata probably being the closest one size-wise, once you see them side by side you realize hands down just how gigantic they are. lol

B. fusca, B. colloseus, B. "peruvianus", and some of the black wing strains of B. craniifer are also pretty hefty, but as I said, they're all dwarfed by giganteus.

that's what keeps me wanting them, that "big" factor! are they slow growers and breeders like the hissers? if you were to start a new colony, how many would you start with? 10 or so?

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that's what keeps me wanting them, that "big" factor! are they slow growers and breeders like the hissers? if you were to start a new colony, how many would you start with? 10 or so?

Slow growers, not really. Maybe a notch or two faster than hissers. They are fairly slow breeders and they can be picky about conditions. However, I've found that having a good substrate effects their breeding rate a lot.

I started my colony with about 30 mixed individuals 3 years ago. I wouldn't recommend anything short of 10 if you want a sizable colony, because you may have to work out quirks in your care and set up for them to get things just right, and some may die off as they reach adulthood.

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Slow growers, not really. Maybe a notch or two faster than hissers. They are fairly slow breeders and they can be picky about conditions. However, I've found that having a good substrate effects their breeding rate a lot.

I started my colony with about 30 mixed individuals 3 years ago. I wouldn't recommend anything short of 10 if you want a sizable colony, because you may have to work out quirks in your care and set up for them to get things just right, and some may die off as they reach adulthood.

I may be in trouble then because I only have 5 nymphs.They look like they are maybe only in their 1st or 2nd molt so far and they burrow into my soil and wood substrate so I never see them unless I sneak up to the tank in the middle of the night with a penlight and see them eating.I had no luck with banana, but they like fresh meat.They do not eat much.I mist the wood in the tank every other day or so and I keep the tank in the basement with a reptile pad which keeps it a constant 78 degrees.So it is dark, humid, quiet and they always get fresh food and crystals every day.They should thrive? I saw your for sale list, and wow Zephyr do you have some neat roaches.You must have a big collection.What is your favorite?

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I may be in trouble then because I only have 5 nymphs.They look like they are maybe only in their 1st or 2nd molt so far and they burrow into my soil and wood substrate so I never see them unless I sneak up to the tank in the middle of the night with a penlight and see them eating.I had no luck with banana, but they like fresh meat.They do not eat much.I mist the wood in the tank every other day or so and I keep the tank in the basement with a reptile pad which keeps it a constant 78 degrees.So it is dark, humid, quiet and they always get fresh food and crystals every day.They should thrive? I saw your for sale list, and wow Zephyr do you have some neat roaches.You must have a big collection.What is your favorite?

Well, you never know what will happen. Maybe your setup will allow them to thrive and minimize casualties when molting. If it does, then maybe your husbandry techniques are the solution to MDS (mysterious death syndrome.)

I don't really have a favorite species per say but my favorite genus is Eublaberus.

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  • 2 weeks later...

This can be a tricky species. A tall tank is not necessary, however, for subadults to molt to adulthood you will need to have molting platforms about 6"x6" to allow them to drop their wings. Even in a nearly perfect enclosure, you will have adults die off randomly after molting. I've been told they need wood to thrive, so mine have plenty of cypress mulch in their substrate. They like things cooler; 67-77 degrees is fine for them. Mine eat a wide variety of things but especially love banana. If you keep them dark and provide a good substrate you will have babies in no time.

Cypress works? Have seen a lot of different things talking about oak leaves. Bought lots of cork oak already including a large hollow piece that they may be able to molt inside(expensive). They're set up is a 55gal. lots of cork oak, hanging plastic plants, on the floor. Am I on the right track?

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B. fusca, B. colloseus, B. "peruvianus", and some of the black wing strains of B. craniifer are also pretty hefty, but as I said, they're all dwarfed by giganteus.

While you're right on the others being dwarfed, Blaberus colloseus is not at all dwarfed and doesn't have the mysterious death issue.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Now you have me intrigued, what is a blaberus colloseus? is it a type of cave roach? how big does it get? where can a person get some? my giganteus are nice and fat and doing well but are still the same size while my hissers are growing very fast.

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Now you have me intrigued, what is a blaberus colloseus? is it a type of cave roach? how big does it get? where can a person get some? my giganteus are nice and fat and doing well but are still the same size while my hissers are growing very fast.

Blaberus colloseus is very similar to Blaberus giganteus, it looks a little different and doesn't have the trouble with die-off. There might be more than one variety or species traded under this name so make sure to get this stock om_Bcolloseus.jpg

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Does this just include BlABERUS GENUS? or refer to the colloseus?

Colloseus not as much as any other species. I have gotten strains of one thing labeled as another. It is vital, especially with Blaberus, to keep strains separate and know who you got them from.

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