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Yeah variety is key.

Most important is always have rotten wood (decaying tree) and if possible dead Oak leaves for them to eat they need it.

Here is what my hissers ate: dry cat food more protein the better, apples, bananas, mango, oranges, romaine lettuce, fresh spinach leaves, white bread moistened with water, cooked beef (given as a treat) (fruit loops cereal as a treat not main diet). Mine also ate rose leaves from the garden but make sure no pesticides or fertilizers are on leaves, as a precaution always rinse leaves under water first to wash away debris. They drink water droplets from a spray bottle I use to mist the cage.

Young nymphs eat adult roach droppings to gain gut bacteria so make sure from mom and other roaches there is some frass left for them.

It's very rewarding when they finally become adults and you raised them. My litter just finished maturing and it was so fun raising them! I kept a few males as pets and donated the rest for others to keep but I'll always have those males as pets to remember watching them grow and the reward at the end . :)

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Yeah variety is key.

Most important is always have rotten wood (decaying tree) and if possible dead Oak leaves for them to eat they need it.

Here is what my hissers ate: dry cat food more protein the better, apples, bananas, mango, oranges, romaine lettuce, fresh spinach leaves, white bread moistened with water, cooked beef (given as a treat) (fruit loops cereal as a treat not main diet). Mine also ate rose leaves from the garden but make sure no pesticides or fertilizers are on leaves, as a precaution always rinse leaves under water first to wash away debris. They drink water droplets from a spray bottle I use to mist the cage.

Young nymphs eat adult roach droppings to gain gut bacteria so make sure from mom and other roaches there is some frass left for them.

It's very rewarding when they finally become adults and you raised them. My litter just finished maturing and it was so fun raising them! I kept a few males as pets and donated the rest for others to keep but I'll always have those males as pets to remember watching them grow and the reward at the end . :)

Sorry but they are absolutely DO NOT NEED some rotten wood or oak leaves. :)

They need quality protein food!

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Sorry but they are absolutely DO NOT NEED some rotten wood or oak leaves. :)

They need quality protein food!

Your going by old care info new studies say they do benefit from leaves and wood which are part of diet in the wild. Good protein is just as important.

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Your going by old care info new studies say they do benefit from leaves and wood which are part of diet in the wild. Good protein is just as important.

I keep all hisser roach species available in captivity - almost all of them absolutely differently than (as you said) 'old care' ;)

and I say they do not need it! (but of course they are omnivorous- they eat everything. :) )

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I keep all hisser roach species available in captivity - almost all of them absolutely differently than (as you said) 'old care' ;)

and I say they do not need it! (but of course they are omnivorous- they eat everything. :) )

Whether or not they need it, they certainly eat it, so it's probably worth providing some anyway, even if it's just for variety's sake. A few oak leaves or a bit of bark isn't going to do any harm.

I always keep some in now because I change what food I provide regularly, so if they don't like that, they can always have some wood or leaves to keep them going until I give them something they do like.

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  • 5 weeks later...

I have noticed that they actually prefer wood over a majority of other foods. That being said deepending on what youre using them for you might want to keep this in mind. If they are being used to breed as feeders i would highly advise against it as it wouldnt provide much end nutrients for the animal they are being fed to.

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  • 4 weeks later...

I wouldn't feed them flowers unless you know for sure the flowers don't have perythrin in them. That's an insecticide! The room temperature has to be 70 degrees ferenheit or above or they won't eat. How are they now after two months. Have they grown up healthy and thriving as we've all hoped. Keep us all posted. Must be cute.

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