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Unidentified polyphagid from Taiwan

This may be the worlds best example of sexual dimorphism in a specie !! Could they be any more different without one growing tentacles and feathers ?? :P

Very cool !

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Hi Randolph,

Thanks for signing in, nice to see you! That is the same species I asked you about a few years ago.

The polyphagid roaches are commonly called 'desert' or 'sand' roaches because many are associated with desert areas though they are normally found in leaf litter accumulations (in arid lands with live oak, mesquite, etc. as opposed to deserts without vegetation) rather than running through barren sand dunes. In the USA we have some desert roach species found in the desert southwest as well as in Florida where the average rainfall is quite high.

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Hi Randolph,

Thanks for signing in, nice to see you! That is the same species I asked you about a few years ago.

The polyphagid roaches are commonly called 'desert' or 'sand' roaches because many are associated with desert areas though they are normally found in leaf litter accumulations (in arid lands with live oak, mesquite, etc. as opposed to deserts without vegetation) rather than running through barren sand dunes. In the USA we have some desert roach species found in the desert southwest as well as in Florida where the average rainfall is quite high.

Hi Orin

i can assure you tehre is no desert in Taiwan, nor dry/arid areas, since it is a sub tropical island(small too, 36 thousand square kilometers with 2/3 of mountain areas), and being raised in taiwan for 15 years and collecting bugs, plus a lot of reading, i have never even seen polyphagid roaches on books or even in wild

i think they might be those chinese medicinal use ones imported to Taiwan, just my two cents

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Hi Orin

i can assure you tehre is no desert in Taiwan, nor dry/arid areas, since it is a sub tropical island(small too, 36 thousand square kilometers with 2/3 of mountain areas), and being raised in taiwan for 15 years and collecting bugs, plus a lot of reading, i have never even seen polyphagid roaches on books or even in wild

i think they might be those chinese medicinal use ones imported to Taiwan, just my two cents

You may well be correct that they were imported from China; just because the stock came from Taiwan doesn't mean it's endemic. It's even slightly possible they came from a medicine shop though I think that detail would have been passed along.

I was trying to explain that polyphagids don't have to live in desert or arid areas, Florida has a similar climate to Taiwan. They also don't require sand but prefer a loose soil (sandy soils tend to be loose) since they spend their lives underground. You'd only find females or nymphs if you knew where to dig.

There are no sand dunes or sandy beaches along the 1,500+ kilometer Taiwanese coastline?

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You may well be correct that they were imported from China; just because the stock came from Taiwan doesn't mean it's endemic. It's even slightly possible they came from a medicine shop though I think that detail would have been passed along.

I was trying to explain that polyphagids don't have to live in desert or arid areas, Florida has a similar climate to Taiwan. They also don't require sand but prefer a loose soil (sandy soils tend to be loose) since they spend their lives underground. You'd only find females or nymphs if you knew where to dig.

There are no sand dunes or sandy beaches along the 1,500+ kilometer Taiwanese coastline?

we do have a lotta sandy beach in west coast of Taiwan, but i havn't seen anything like that when i was a bird guide for international black faced spoonbiil society when i was 13..and i do hang out in beach a lot

and in the most "cavey" area of Taiwan, is the Kenting national park where ancient reefs rised into caves, and never seen or heard of that from any resources, too

and you have to know different from florida, Taiwan is highly , or overly developed, coast line, even plains and lower mountain species had been discovered and named or identified for centuries, cuz the size is just small

what I am trying to say is, if it's native species that is not inhabit in some deep mountains, it should be on the book

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'Unidentified' means the species most likely has a scientific name but the name is not known. 'Undescribed' is the term for a species without a scientific name. The photograph is labeled unidentified.

I have a friend in Taiwan who told me he has had no luck finding cockroach literature with the exception of pest control information and a few species listed in general entomology texts. Do you have a paper, book or books that claim to list all or most known Blattodea species found in Taiwan (even all known genera would be great). If you do have a complete list and you could post it here (or a link to an online resource) that would be really helpful in figuring out what species this is, primarily if there is only one polyphagid species in Taiwan. I understand all the literature is probably in Chinese but the scientific names and family would still be in Latin. I'm sure it would also prove useful to other Taiwanese hobbyists who visit this board. Thanks.

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'Unidentified' means the species most likely has a scientific name but the name is not known. 'Undescribed' is the term for a species without a scientific name. The photograph is labeled unidentified.

I have a friend in Taiwan who told me he has had no luck finding cockroach literature with the exception of pest control information and a few species listed in general entomology texts. Do you have a paper, book or books that claim to list all or most known Blattodea species found in Taiwan (even all known genera would be great). If you do have a complete list and you could post it here (or a link to an online resource) that would be really helpful in figuring out what species this is, primarily if there is only one polyphagid species in Taiwan. I understand all the literature is probably in Chinese but the scientific names and family would still be in Latin. I'm sure it would also prove useful to other Taiwanese hobbyists who visit this board. Thanks.

plz tell your friend to go to bookstore and actually take a look with just insect books, instead of staying at home typing infront of computers

i douno much about papers of roaches, but just in general and base on my field experiences

major insect hand guides do have listed generas, just go to any eslitebooks stores in any cities of Taiwan, you will find bunch

ex

http://gaga.jes.mlc.edu.tw/new23/cp03_71.htm

four subfamilies 33 genus and 75 species known

Blattidae, Phyllodromiidae, Blaberidae, Polyphagidae

Superfamily Blattoidea

Family Blattidae

Subfamily Blattinae

Genus Cutilia

Genus Dorylaea

Genus Hebardina

Genus Homalosilpha

Genus Neostylopyga

Genus Platyzosteria

Genus Periplaneta

Superfamily Blaberoidea

Family Polyphagidae

Subfamily Holocompsinae

Genus Holocompsa

Subfamily Polyphaginae

Genus Eucorydia

Family Blattellidae

Subfamily Anapletinae

Genus Anaplecta

Genus Anaplectella

Subfamily Plectopterinae

Genus Balta

Genus Chorisoneura

Genus Margattea

Genus Supella

Subfamily Blattellinae

Genus Asiablatta

Genus Blattella

Genus Episymploce

Genus Hemithyrsocora

Genus Lobopterella

Genus Sigmella

Genus Symploce

Family Blaberidae

Subfamily Panesthiinae

Genus Panesthia

Genus Salganea

Subfamily Pycnoscelinae

Genus Pycnoscelis

Subfamily Oxyhaloinae

Genus Nauphoeta

Subfamily Epilamprinae

Genus Opisthoplatia

Genus Rhabdoblatta

Subfamily Perisphaerinae

Genus Paranauphoeta

Genus Trichoblatta

Subfamily Diplopterinae

Genus Diploptera

but the only known one from the subfamily, is the only genus,is a flying colourful one - Eucorydia aenea dasytoides

some id keys

http://www.swannet.com.tw/taxonomy/KMDocs/35124633.doc

i m not denying the possibility that it might be a new sp, or introduced sp, but just saying, the chance is too low

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Family Polyphagidae

Genus Holocompsa

Genus Eucorydia

Eucorydia purpuralis is also listed from Taiwan but I imagine the females also have wings (I'm guessing the Holocompsa are far too small). Would you happen to have a photo of any Chinese or Taiwanese polyphagids, especially the Eucorydia? I found this photo of Eupolyphaga sinensis online but only the female and it looks nearly black (the shrunken shape is the result of how it was preserved but its hard to say what color it was before it died). Wingless polyphagid females do usually look pretty similar. The scale shows it's about the same size:

E.sinensis

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Eucorydia purpuralis is also listed from Taiwan but I imagine the females also have wings (I'm guessing the Holocompsa are far too small). Would you happen to have a photo of any Chinese or Taiwanese polyphagids, especially the Eucorydia? I found this photo of Eupolyphaga sinensis online but only the female and it looks nearly black (the shrunken shape is the result of how it was preserved but its hard to say what color it was before it died). Wingless polyphagid females do usually look pretty similar. The scale shows it's about the same size:

E.sinensis

Eucorydia aenea dasytoides

http://insectforum.no-ip.org/gods/cgi-bin/...&topic=8716

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Wow! Those are amazing, what is the adult size in millimeters?

Are the Eupolyphaga available live from the medicine shops or only dead? Any idea where to find a photo of a living male and female of that species?

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Wow! Those are amazing, what is the adult size in millimeters?

Are the Eupolyphaga available live from the medicine shops or only dead? Any idea where to find a photo of a living male and female of that species?

they are around 34-36mm, females are SUPER rare by unknown reasons....males fly pretty high

they are dried goods and i guess u asked the wrong person, since herbal medicine in Taiwan is not as big as in China...so i really have no idea with non-native species....

this thread reminds me the so called HK giant centipede are not actually from hong kong, but more like transfer from china and export from HK, the native species in hk are under 15 cm, wherea the "HK giant" are a lot bigger than that

and personally, as a Taiwanese, i feel a lill bit happy that taiwan can finally take this tiny bit advantage from China, since they have taken so much away from us, lol

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  • 1 year later...

This is actually a Mainland China species, and very closeed to Eupolyphaga sinensis (Walker, 1868), a very common culture species for medicine.

This colony may be introduced from Taiwan to America/Europe, but never be the Taiwanese species~

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