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Roachsmith

California Mystery Cockroach

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yea i want to learn a bit more of these .. i have much family in Santa Rosa, and i might just take a trip over there and see if i cant catch a few myself, or possibly pick some up and give a small finders fee to ya :)

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i know im reviving a dead topic... but wanted an update on these guys. they are pretty cool looking. I kinda like the fact that they are so small. if your able to breed them would you be willing to sell any? or atleast direct me to an area where i could find some?

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Alan,

Since Luridiblatta are native to the dryer regions bordering the Mediterranean, I would keep them in a well-ventilated enclosure with a relatively dry to slightly damp substrate. As long as the air flow is good enough, the roaches might appreciate a light misting every other day providing all moisture evaporates over a half-day's time. I would imagine a similar setup you have for your Blattella vaga would probably be sufficient. My Loboptera decipiens which are from that same region, are fairing quite well kept this way. Most of their moisture comes from the sweet potato and apple slices I provide them. They seem to be highly susceptible to tracheal infections if maintained within humid, stagnant enclosures. My second generation ooths just started hatching last week. Yeah!

Mark

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Alan,

Since Luridiblatta are native to the dryer regions bordering the Mediterranean, I would keep them in a well-ventilated enclosure with a relatively dry to slightly damp substrate. As long as the air flow is good enough, the roaches might appreciate a light misting every other day providing all moisture evaporates over a half-day's time. I would imagine a similar setup you have for your Blattella vaga would probably be sufficient. My Loboptera decipiens which are from that same region, are fairing quite well kept this way. Most of their moisture comes from the sweet potato and apple slices I provide them. They seem to be highly susceptible to tracheal infections if maintained within humid, stagnant enclosures. My second generation ooths just started hatching last week. Yeah!

Mark

Thanks for the info. I'll try keeping them similarly to B. gaga :)

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A few years ago I raised small cockroaches of the genus Latiblattella and Euthlastoblatta, in well-ventilated small containers. the floor without substrate but with cardboard and dried leaves and in the middle a soda bottle cap (stucked on the floor) with wet toilet paper that is where the cockroaches drink water and get wet .I remove the ootecas and also put them in soda caps with very squeezed toilet paper in small unventilated container until they hatch, the nymphs walk on the walls, but when they have no substrate on the floor, they stay on dry leaves and cardboard,

anyway, I put a little of cooking oil on the walls so they do not escape,

I think that babies can get stuck in the Vaseline and die , so it is best to use oil but only what stain the fingers.

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A few years ago I raised small cockroaches of the genus Latiblattella and Euthlastoblatta, in well-ventilated small containers. the floor without substrate but with cardboard and dried leaves and in the middle a soda bottle cap (stucked on the floor) with wet toilet paper that is where the cockroaches drink water and get wet .I remove the ootecas and also put them in soda caps with very squeezed toilet paper in small unventilated container until they hatch, the nymphs walk on the walls, but when they have no substrate on the floor, they stay on dry leaves and cardboard,

anyway, I put a little of cooking oil on the walls so they do not escape,

I think that babies can get stuck in the Vaseline and die , so it is best to use oil but only what stain the fingers.

Cool, got any pictures of your Euthlastoblatta? No one I know of has been able to breed them. :)

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sorry, right now i have no photos of live cockroaches. the first photo is a male of Euthlastoblatta totonaca, the second are two females of E. chiapas and the third is a female of E. orizabae (the male of this is fully alate, but have no photo)

i'm now begining to raisin cockroaches again, and i'm going to take photos. so right now i'm begining to breed Anisopygia latisecta

post-10220-0-36555200-1464304207_thumb.jpg

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Cool, thanks for sharing! So have you bred the all the Euthlastoblatta pictured? Are you in the US? If so, that's pretty cool that so many new Ectobiids have made it into the US hobby! :D The Anisopygia latisecta look cool!

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yes, i was raised the 3 species. Euthlastoblatta totonaca and E. orizabae were brought up very well and had offspring with a good development to adulthood but Euthlastoblatta chiapas do not.

so E. chiapas is a mountainous species where the climate is cold like in the USA, but i live in the warm tropical coastal plain of the state of Veracruz, and in general the cold mountainous climate cockroches do not achieved in tropical areas. in fact there are diferent species who never share the same habitat. But it is interesting that in the USA the species that living in coastal plains can be adapted to more tropical climates as in the state of Florida. I think there is an interesting latitudinal gradient to the distribution of the Gulf coastal plain of Euthlastoblatta genus: Texas-->Tamaulipas-->Veracruz (so in Texas and Tamaulipas you have one species: Euthlastoblatta abortiva --> http://bugguide.net/node/view/592350 this one without abdomen).

I am very happy to contribute to the hobby of cockroaches which is beautifully developed in the USA as anywhere else. I have never posted insects but I 'd like to try.. :)

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Cool, our American Euthlastoblatta, E.gemma and E.abortiva, are really hard to breed successfully. As far as I know no one has gotten their ootheca to hatch. (Actually I don't think anyone has ever tried to breed E.abortiva, only E.gemma). Good to hear that there are some species in the genus that will breed readily in captivity. :)

Would be cool to get some of your native species in the hobby here, I'm a big fan of little Ectobiids, which you seem to have plenty of! :D Ever seen any Corydiids there?

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yea! :D here are 3 species of corydiids: Holocompsa tolteca, Holocompsa azteca, Homoeogamia mexicana, i was collected all 3 species together in Quercus Three holes of the cloud forest

so, Homoeogamia mexicana it's prolific and easy to breed! so have no photos

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yea! :D here are 3 species of corydiids: Holocompsa tolteca, Holocompsa azteca, Homoeogamia mexicana, i was collected all 3 species together in Quercus Three holes of the cloud forest

so, Homoeogamia mexicana it's prolific and easy to breed! so have no photos

Amazing, Corydiids are my favorite group of roaches, all of those species sound really cool! You should try to get some pictures if you find any, I would love to see them! :D

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Maybe this will help: http://www.roachforum.com/index.php?showtopic=6242 Though you have uploaded photos before, wonder why you can't now?

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voila!!

Dude here are two photos of my corydiids: Holocompsa tolteca und H. azteca :D

and thankyou for the link!!

Amazing, Holocompsa are so pretty looking! Have you successfully bred them? If so, what were your breeding parameters?

my new Anisopygia start rearing!! :D

Good, glad to see the Anisopygia are doing well! Let us know how they do! :)

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yes i started 4 Holocompsa tolteca and 7 Holocompsa azteca (not reviewed the sexes ) in a small ventilated container with dry steriled sand,

moistened only at one end of the container by a wet cotton to have a gradient of moisture and i fed them with dog chow's and corn flakes,

not separated oothecas, I saw the first hatched nymphs in the same container, HOWEVER, a small cousin experienced putting water in my containers and all died.

so i had no chance to collect them after I moved to live in an apartment.

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