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Simandoa conserfariam care (summary ?)


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Hello to all,

I would like to start a Simandoa conserfariam colony. I have the opportunity to receive 12 nymphs and I am looking for information for their care.

I have already read all the topics about them on the forum and I found this :

- 75-80F (heat mat on one side of the box)

- Coco substrate and/or top soil, with forest moss, tree leaves and decaying wood

- Moist but not soggy substrate (several sprays per week if needed)

- Very high ventilation

- Some inches of substrate but generally not a burrowing species in captivity

- Well closed container because of the risk of escape

- Enough space as the species is sensitive to overcrowding

- Many hiding places such as cork bark or egg cartons

- Food rich in various fruits, some vegetables and greens, fish flakes or cat food, Beetle Jelly

- Springtails or isopods to clean up mold

 

Did I forget something? Did I make a mistake somewhere?

Do you have any other advice?

I am interested in this species for conservation purposes and would like to do some breeding to continue to spread this species in the hobby ;)

Thanks in advance

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I don't keep them that warm usually. The only concern with extra heating is drying them out with a heat mat if you forget to water. I just feed dog food and a little fruit. I haven't had luck with them eating vegetable unless starving. Good luck.

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14 hours ago, Yama777 said:

Springtails or isopods to clean up mold

Definitely go with springtails, not isopods.

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Thank you for your answers!
Someone advised me to make a bioactive substrate with 100% dead oak leaves and decaying wood harvested in the forest (without cleaning it or putting it in the oven or boiling water, just check that there are no predatory myriapods like Lithobius spp.)
What do you think about it?
No risk of pathogenic fungi or parasites?

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5 hours ago, Yama777 said:

Thank you for your answers!
Someone advised me to make a bioactive substrate with 100% dead oak leaves and decaying wood harvested in the forest (without cleaning it or putting it in the oven or boiling water, just check that there are no predatory myriapods like Lithobius spp.)
What do you think about it?
No risk of pathogenic fungi or parasites?

I'd highly advise against it, that's a fantastic way to bring in horrible pests and pathogens, and is how I've introduced entomophagous fungi into my collection in the past... An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, definitely sterilize any leaf litter, wood, bark, soil, etc. that you bring into your cultures from outdoors before use. Sometimes you'll get lucky and nothing bad will be brought in with that material, but other times the results of using unsterilized materials can be catastrophic. All depends on the microfauna in your specific area. The wood and leaves should be just as palatable and nutritious after sterilization.

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Thank you for your answer!
That's what I was afraid of...
If I put everything in the oven or microwave, the fauna will be killed, but probably not the fungus and molds....
Do you have any advice on how to properly sterilize?

I'm going to try to buy some springtails to clean up any mold that may appear.

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10 hours ago, Yama777 said:

Thank you for your answer!
That's what I was afraid of...
If I put everything in the oven or microwave, the fauna will be killed, but probably not the fungus and molds....
Do you have any advice on how to properly sterilize?

I'm going to try to buy some springtails to clean up any mold that may appear.

I put my stuff in the microwave as well, definitely kills the fungus so long as you make sure the stuff is wet when you put it in, and that it's steaming hot when you remove it.

New molds will rapidly colonize freshly sterilized medium from spores in the air, in your enclosures, etc., but these are generally harmless and disappear after a couple weeks (especially if you've got springtails in there).

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  • 3 weeks later...

My group lives in the following conditions:

Temperature: 27—30°C
Air humidity: plentiful spraying once a week
Substrate: coconut chips
Shelters: cork oak bark
Food: apples, carrots, gammarus

They live and reproduce steadily.

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