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Euthlastoblatta gemma


Cariblatta lutea
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This species does not look as pretty from your photo compared to the bugguide photos Lol. They should be pretty, their former genus name was Aglaopteryx which I read means beautiful wing. But the Aglao part might also mean bright.

So what type of areas do you find this species Alex?

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Yeah guys I did have them and I found them in Florida sandy scrub habitat that was recently burned. I found them as nymphs and raised them to adulthood with no problems.

The ooths were plentiful and I had left a few in the cage and separated some to incubate. None of them hatched.

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It was a slash pine habitat with short palms on the ground. I kept them at 80 with mid humidity little to no condensation on the lid.

Crazy busy and that sucks....I work ft and do school pt. I barley have time for what lives with me. I only get to travel once or twice a week and that is if I am not beat from work and don't have assignments due. I want to camp out on long pine key or fakahatchee slough or the thousand islands on the southwestern coast, but that means talking my wife into going with me.

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Yeah guys I did have them and I found them in Florida sandy scrub habitat that was recently burned. I found them as nymphs and raised them to adulthood with no problems.

The ooths were plentiful and I had left a few in the cage and separated some to incubate. None of them hatched.

Thanks for the info. Sounds like I'm getting myself into difficult task....LOL

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Its pronotum looks like a sad puppy's face lol

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So the Euthlastoblatta gemma are only on the coast? Can you not find them in where you are Alex?

I have never seen them on the coast I live on the coast. The sandy scrub habitat is in the center of the state, it used to be a beach many many many years ago when the rest of south Florida was underwater that is why the native biodiversity is so much higher there than the young oolitic limestone habitat that most of the South Floridians know. A new species of semi-aquatic bee was recently described in the sand ridges. That is a big insect to go un-described for so long.

Good luck Cariblatta. In hindsight I would use corkbark and coco chunks for substrate.

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A new milliped (probably 50 X the mass of that bee sp.) was described from FL just a few months back but it is a rather cryptic sp.

That's amazing. is it cool looking? I can go out and look for it....After I go out and catch some Broward banded milkweed assassin bugs.

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The female in the picture passed away without dropping any oothe for me, and the nymphs that I've been saving for my friend turned out to be a gray color form of Latiblattella rehni! Unfortunately, both turned out to be males so I was giving up on breeding them.....until I found an adult female plus 3 nymphs while I was in northern FL for family vacation! I'm really hoping to be able to breed these :)

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